Our first meal in Saigon was a home-cooked bowl of mi Quang, a specialty noodle dish from the Quang Nam province of central Vietnam. Mi Quang can consist of many different ingredients, but the common factors are noodles and turmeric. You can have shrimp, pork, chicken, or all of the above and then some, in your bowl of mi Quang. Dessert in Vietnam (and throughout Asia) often consists of fruit. I tried a fruit I’d never had before: vu sua, which translates into English as “breast milk” [pause for inappropriate,

In December, the hubs and I flew to Vietnam to work on a marketing campaign for the gourmet American-style popcorn, Uncle Jax. We got to fly Japan Airlines business class—it’s always a major bonus to fly business. The food is better, and you often get a three to five course meal service. (Five courses, in classic French tradition, consist of appetizer, salad, main, cheese, and dessert.) Plus there’s all-you-can-drink alcoholic beverages, of which I used to take advantage until I became a seasoned traveler and began to value rest over

In my last post about how Apple TV makes television entertainment accessible for the Blind, I mentioned how I’ve been on a Netflix binge. Netflix has come such a long way since its baby years back when it was a DVD rental-by-mail concept. Now it’s a powerhouse putting out acclaimed original programming. I personally love “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmitt”, “Grace and Frankie”, “BoJack Horseman”, and “Master of None”. Now that you’ve judged my taste in television, I’ll tell you why I shower praises upon Netflix. In 2015, Netflix responded to a

Summer’s nearly over, so all that television binging is about to come to an end. But fall also marks the time for season premieres, so if you’re a true American, you’re right back on the couch, just like the potato you were a month ago. I’ve been on a Netflix binge lately (more on this later). And the awesome thing that allows me to watch (and I say “watch” in all hilarity) Netflix is my Apple TV. The hubs ordered the latest fourth generation Apple TV when it came out

It’s the dog days of summer for sure, and the one thing I wholly depend on in the midst of this heat is my Nest. We’ve been the proud owners of a Nest device for a few years now. Our version is the first-generation, and Nest is now on their third. The reason I love our Nest is because, as a blind user, it helps me regulate the home climate control system myself. Before we had a Nest, I used to FaceTime the hubs or a friend on my iPhone

For most of my life, I didn’t care for hot pot;in my opinion, it was a dish in which too many things were going on, and yet they all soaked up the same, monotonous flavor from the boiling broth. That is, until I had Little Sheep Mongolian Hot Pot when it opened an outpost in Houston some years back. That was where I learned the broth is only half the game. Hot pot is also about the dipping sauce. Since then, hot pot has become a regular meal in our

Piggybacking on my recent posts on eating Din Tai Fung, beef noodle soup, and stinky tofu in Taipei, here’s a video on me trying snacks I brought back from various trips to Asia, including Taiwan, Singapore, and Japan. This is a new series I’m launching on my YouTube channel, and it’s called “Christine Tries.” The fun part about this video is I have no idea what I brought back from Asia (I let my friends pick snacks off the shelves without telling me what they were), and now I’m going

Today, my mama would’ve turned 68 if she was still alive. In honor of her birthday, I’m sharing this video. The backstory: I was contacted by this talented filmmaker, Andrew Gooi, earlier this year. Formerly a civil engineer, Andrew recently decided to pursue his passion for film and food full-time. Food Talkies is his current project, and “Food From Home” is a new mini-docu film collection that captures personal food stories. Andrew flew to my hometown of Houston in July and shot two short films with me: it was a

You can’t go to Taipei and not hit up a street market or two, or three…or more. There are many street markets in Taipei, but as I was only there for three days, I only had the chance to hit up two. On one of the afternoons, I went to Ximending, which is more of a shopping district. (Okay, I admit, I wanted to go to UNIQLO.) I sampled a few street foods there, such as the fried chicken cutlet, grilled mochi, oyster vermicelli with pig intestine, and boba tea

I was told by a couple of Taiwanese-American friends that Yong Kang Beef Noodle served some of the best beef noodle soup in Taipei. In the evening after I gave my TEDxTaipei Talk, I rewarded myself with a trip to Yong Kang. I think the first time I ever tasted Taiwanese-style beef noodle soup was at Sanding in Houston. The broth is aromatic with remnants of five-spice, which typically consists of star anise, cloves, cinnamon, fennel seeds, and peppercorns. In a typical bowl, you’ll find beef (duh), bon choy, medium-width

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