I can’t believe it’s been five years since my own season of MasterChef! Last night, the show’s eighth season crowned their new American MasterChef on FOX. Although I haven’t really followed an entire season since season 4, I tuned in near the end of last night’s finale. Congratulations, Dino! And Ebony and Jason, you were amazing, too. Ebony, I admire your grit, and Jason, your finale meal is the one I’d most want to eat. To commemorate my victory anniversary, the hubs and I released Five years after MasterChef: Q&A

Following my L.A. Visit when I spent a lot of meals in Koreatown, I thought I’d share a Korean comfort food favorite: kim chi fried rice! And to make it even better, I cook it with Spam. Now I know not everyone is into the luncheon meat in a can, but did you know that in Korea, Spam is a prized food? It’s relatively expensive, and there exists such a thing as the Spam gift basket.. The photo above of my fried rice doesn’t actually have any kim chi in

Blood sausage. It sounds gross, but it’s delicious. Many cultures have a version, from the English black pudding to the Cajun boudin. Koreans have their own blood sausage, too, called soondae. The Korean version is chewy thanks to the inclusion of sweet potato noodles. The first time I tried soondae at a Korean grocery store’s food court in Houston, I thought it was just okay: nothing special, a little dry. Then I had it in Dallas from a little Korean deli. I dipped it in the salt, which enhanced the

Bossam is one of my favorite Korean dishes. I don’t get to eat it often, so it’s always a special occasion when I do get it. Bossam consists of tucking pork belly and usually a thin slice of sweet pickled radish or even kim chi into a lettuce leaf or a thin sheet of rice cake, and then dipping it in either sesame oil with salt and pepper or doenjang, fermented soybean paste (my personal prefernce). One of my earliest memories having bossam was in Seoul—after a long night of

There are multiple locations of Ham Ji Park: one on W. 6th Street, one on W. Pico Boulevard, and one in Buena Park. The hubs and I were told to go here for gamja tang, a comforting Korean pork neck and potato stew. This stew is one of the hubs’s favorite—he says it’s best after a night of drinking soju. But this time, since the in-laws joined us in L.A., instead of a late-night snack, we had the gamja tang for early dinner. The stew was very good, but I’ve

My in-laws love visiting L.A. because they feel right at home in Koreatown—you can virtually get by with only speaking Korean. Day 1 in Los Angeles Ham Ji Park Griffith Observatory For lunch, we hit up Ham Ji Park, which was recommended by a friend for their gamja tang, a Korean pork neck and potato stew usually consumed late night after much soju. After lunch, the mama-in-law wants to shop for Korean ingredients—red pepper flakes for making kim chi, to be exact—so we wander over to a Korean food boutique

Hurricane Harvey relief: How you can help

#harvey relief: Dropping donations to #houston shelters

Posted by Christine Ha on Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Once the Houston roads began clearing by Tuesday morning, the hubs and I drove through the relentless rain collecting donations from neighbors and friends to deliver them to local shelters. We even live-streamed the collection and drop-off on my Facebook. I fortuitously discovered a “donate” link you could add to your Facebook Live video, so I included it in the post, linking it to the Houston Food Bank, which happens to the the largest food bank in America feeding the nation’s fourth largest city. I’m proud to say as I

I live in Houston, and all that’s been on our minds lately is Hurricane-turned-Tropical Storm Harvey, which has been shredding southeast Texas to pieces since late last week. While I have been fortunate thus far—my family, friends, and neighbors are safe, and our house is still intact and dry—there are many of my fellow Houstonians whose lives and properties have been severely impacted by Harvey. Having lived in Houston for most of my life, I’ve experienced quite a few hurricanes, storms, and floods. I thought I’d take this opportunity to

Because I live in Houston where there’s a United Airlines hub, I frequently fly United. I thought it would be fun to shoot a series on my YouTube channel in which I do a true blind taste test of the three snack boxes available on UA flights. [Embed]https://youtu.be/Y6YWzny6pzM[/embed] I taste each item, guess what they are, and then give my rating. When my stomach growls thirty thousand feet above ground, these snack boxes are my go-to purchases—I like the variety inside (remember my palate gets bored easily. [Embed]https://youtu.be/Pshfa7rR3z0[/embed] They may

I’ve been on the board of advisors for Aira for a couple of years now, and I’m proud to see how much the tech start-up has grown since its grassroots days in San Diego. Today, I’m happy to share with you Aira’s latest project, which has them partnering with AT&T to launch this social campaign called #ExperienceMore. In an effort to raise awareness about and champion the resilience of blind people everywhere, AT&T and Aira are asking such individuals to share their own personal story of how they #ExperienceMore. (You

1 2 3 46 Page 1 of 46