Posts in Tag

vegetarian

You just celebrated Easter, and that could very well mean you have a dozen-plus leftover eggs on your hands. Here’s a delicious yet simple recipe for onsen tamago, which translates from Japanese as “hot springs egg.” When I first visited Japan, a group of us went to Hakone and stayed in a hot springs inn near Mount Fuji. After taking the cable car to the top of a nearby mountain, we sat down in a cafe and ordered Fuji apples and onsen tamago. (Yeah, super creative, right?) The egg came

Inspired by my trip to Nashville, where I had tasty meals at both Arnold’s Country Kitchen and Hattie B’s Hot Chicken, here’s a recipe for mac ’n cheese. I had this dish at both restaurants—Arnold’s makes a pretty classic one, while Hattie B’s adds pimento cheese. Funny story: during one of my NMO attacks years ago, I was put on several days of intravenous corticosteroids, whose side effects include insomnia, water retention, and increased appetite. For days, all I craved was instant mac ’n cheese—you know, the kind that comes

My first memories of biscuits were the kind you find in the frozen aisle at the grocery store, hugging a sad piece of shriveled sausage and suffocating inside cellophane. My mama bought boxes of these and would instruct me to microwave one every morning for breakfast. It was so dry and boring—oh, how I wished there was a little egg or slice of American cheese tucked in there to give it a little lube. Then I moved on to better biscuits—the ones that come as part of a fried chicken

This Monday is Memorial Day, the official day we commemorate soldiers who have given their lives for our country. It’s a national holiday and also signifies the kick-off of summer. All across America, and especially in the South, thousands of grills (and barbecue-goers) will get lit! Because meat is generally the main focus of the grill, the sides often get glossed over. But as we all know the sides are what make the Thanksgiving meal, I’m not going to give you yet another meat recipe today. Instead, I’m going to

As promised, I’m going to start posting recipes inspired by my travels, and I’m interrupting the L.A. series to bring you a recipe inspired by my visit to London. You might ask what does Indian have to do with London, but rumor has it London is home to some of the best Indian food in the world, even better than (gasp!) India itself. My theory behind this is similar to why I believe America has better pho than Vietnam: quite simply, the quality of ingredients are superior in the est.

My mama-in-law likes to gift us Asian pears. They are large and juicy with sweet, crispy flesh. I’ve made them into pear, blueberry, and banana juice, and we’ve eaten many of them purely sliced as a snack. But they are quite sizable, so we often can’t go through them as quickly as we receive them. I don’t like to waste food, so poaching them allows me to prolong their refrigerator shelf life and, more selfishly, my own enjoyment of their unique succulence.

I love corn and have to have it every Thanksgiving. It adds a nice crispy texture next to the creamy potatoes and casseroles. Back when I was an amateur cook, I used to serve them straight out of a can with some butter, salt, and pepper. Now I’ve graduated to cutting them off the cob and increasing the number of ingredients used.

When I think of American comfort food, I think of potatoes. I love potatoes in all forms: fried, baked, mashed, smashed, or whipped. What, you might ask, is the difference between mashed potatoes, smashed potatoes, and whipped potatoes? After digging around online, I’ve come up with this answer.

Back in October, I had taken a trip to the Bay area and upon a dinner at Thomas Keller’s Ad Hoc Restaurant, I came across these wonderful purple potatoes that were the highlight of my evening meal. They stole the show even next to the Wagyu beef skewers. After returning to home sweet home in Houston, I had to find and cook these purple potatoes myself. Indeed I found them in the potato section of H-E-B, and John kindly reminded me that he’d suggested I try these purple potatoes long

A classic antipasto italiano–Italian Appetizer–is bruschetta, pronounced with a short “u” as in “brush” and a hard “ch” sound like a “k” as in “basket”. Many Americans incorrectly use a long “u” and a soft “shh” sound, and while this is acceptable in most English speaking countries, I like to use the authentic Italian version, complete with rolling R’s and gusto. Now that we’ve got the pronunciation stuff out of the way, let’s move on to the dish itself. I recently hosted another birthday dinner for friends Joy, Joanna, Heari,

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