Posts in Tag

vegetables

The place I enjoyed eating at the most during this trip to Dallas was Madrina, and sadly, the restaurant has since closed. Regardless, I’m paying tribute to Madrina’s excellent Mexican fare with this recipe for elote, or grilled Mexican street corn. I served elote as a side dish to my Korean Wagyu beef taco at my recent pop-up with Ozone in Hong Kong, and it was a hit, especially with the bar’s head chef (who happens to be Brazilian). This colorful dish celebrates summer’s bounty; full of flavor yet well-balanced,

Following my trip to Syracuse and dinner at Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, and with it being deep into the summer season, I thought I’d post a recipe for baked beans. Side dishes are often overlooked at a barbecue feast, but you need those complementary accompaniments to provide variety and cut through the fatty richness of barbecued meats. Besides, I’ve posted before on how to make pork ribs and grilled chicken, so this time, I’m showing you a side instead. When I think of baked beans, I think of my elementary school cafeteria

What I noticed about my dining experiences at Avec, Blackbird, and Girl and the Goat was their common use of fresh, seasonal ingredients. Whether it’s fish or vegetables, the dishes are reflective of the time of year. The hubs and I have a friend who’s an avid fisher, and he gifted us this hybrid striped bass. There’s no better way to enjoy fresh seafood than to fire it up quickly on the pan with butter, salt, and cracked black pepper before giving it a squeeze of lemon prior to eating.

It seems every city we visited in the UK and Ireland had a rendition of the good ol’, popular fish ’n chips. It’s no wonder, because the stuff is quick, easy, cheap, filling, and delicious. Fish ’n chips may be a British-born dish, but I grew up eating at Long John Silver’s, which has a similar offering of fried seafood and fried potatoes (called “fries” in the U.S. And “chips” in the UK and Ireland—and in case you are wondering, what Americans call “chips” are known as “crisps” over there).

I may cook the food, but the hubs grows the food. Yup, that’s an aerial view of our urban garden above. The hubs and I began our garden adventures a few years ago after we’d moved into our current home, which had a small (but garden beckoning) backyard. We started off with herbs in a few planters and then expanded to a raised garden bed made from trapezoidal wooden boards purchased from Costco. The hubs has since graduated to making his own wooden garden beds with cedar planks freshly cut

I love corn and have to have it every Thanksgiving. It adds a nice crispy texture next to the creamy potatoes and casseroles. Back when I was an amateur cook, I used to serve them straight out of a can with some butter, salt, and pepper. Now I’ve graduated to cutting them off the cob and increasing the number of ingredients used.

When I think of American comfort food, I think of potatoes. I love potatoes in all forms: fried, baked, mashed, smashed, or whipped. What, you might ask, is the difference between mashed potatoes, smashed potatoes, and whipped potatoes? After digging around online, I’ve come up with this answer.

Brussels sprouts, as they’re named, are of Belgian and Roman origin. They resemble miniature heads of cabbage, and while that may not sound appealing, Brussels sprouts are one of my favorite vegetables of late. They’re nutritious and delicious with their anti-cancer properties and earthy, nutty flavor. Overcook them, and they’ll be gross. But when made right, Brussels sprouts offer just the right balance of texture: tender yet crispy. So forget those soggy, bland, dull gray Brussels sprouts of yesteryear. Roast and/or broil them, and you’ll get some stellar sprouts. My

Back in October, I had taken a trip to the Bay area and upon a dinner at Thomas Keller’s Ad Hoc Restaurant, I came across these wonderful purple potatoes that were the highlight of my evening meal. They stole the show even next to the Wagyu beef skewers. After returning to home sweet home in Houston, I had to find and cook these purple potatoes myself. Indeed I found them in the potato section of H-E-B, and John kindly reminded me that he’d suggested I try these purple potatoes long

The last time I posted an urban garden update, it was before Houston hit its hottest time of year–that is, the month of August. This year’s summer has had record-breaking heat, record-breaking lack of rain. For every single day in August (and I’m not even exaggerating), we had highs above 100, and I can only recall one morning when it sprinkled. You can imagine how desert-like our city has become. The drought and extreme heat have not left our garden very viable. In fact, the only thing that seems to

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