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travel

Dominique Ansel is best known for his original cronet, which was a portmanteau of a croissant and donut. On this trip to New York, I had a meeting not too far from his eponymous bakery, and so I decided to try my luck at getting a cronut afterwards. We arrived at the bakery around 10:30 on a Friday morning and breathed a sigh of relief when the queue was short. Sadly, though, when it was our turn, the cronut had already sold out. We opted for a frozen s’more instead,

After imbibing at Please Don’t Tell, the hubs and I parted ways with our friends and wandered down the street looking for a bite to eat. We stumbled upon this yakitori-izakaya type. It looked crowded without a horrendous wait, so we decided to step in and give it a try. After about a five-minute wait, we were escorted to a table towards the back. Oh! Taisho seems like your straightforward Japanese snack and socializing kind of place. Service is quick and just friendly enough to warrant no complaints, but it’s

I’ve been trying to get into Please Don’t Tell (or PDT for short) since 2013. It seems like every time we make plans for it, we couldn’t get reservations. Yes, it’s just a cocktail bar, but it’s one of the first modern speakeasies that I’d heard of, and the fact that you have to enter the bar through a telephone booth inside a hot dog shop makes its charm quite attractive to both locals and tourists and, thus, difficult to get into. Speaking of reservations, to get one, the phone

David Chang’s Momofuku is an empire. And the Momofuku Milk Bar, in my opinion, is the crown jewel of that empire. Now, I’m not even a desserts gal, but Milk Bar does some crazy-creative stuff with sweets, and they’re delicious. While the crack pie (think cookie dough with oats and sugar and salt to the nth degree) is perhaps Milk Bar’s most popular dessert, I much prefer the corn cookie (hint: must love corn). One thing I can agree on, however, is the cereal milk. Imagine drinking the milk after

This was my second time visiting Maharlika Filipino Moderna, which I recently learned is pronounced “mah-HAR-lee-kah” with an emphasis on the second syllable. Maharlika was where I tried my first cocktail with fish sauce back in 2013. I was nervous to try it at first, but my cousin pointed out I got fish sauce tattooed on me, I had to try it. Not being one to turn something down, I said yes, and it changed my life. Maharlika’s fish sauce michelada was proof fish sauce could be done in cocktails.

I first heard about Xi’an Famous Foods when Anthony Bourdain featured it on his former show. Once we landed in NYC, since we were in the area, the hubs, our friend, and I decided to stop in at Xi’an for lunch. The outpost we went to was in East Village and tiny, tiny. I’m talking there’s just a few tables lining one wall, a bar lining the other wall, and room down the middle for the queue that ostensibly fills up during meal time. There’s a boombox playing old school

Considering this New York trip took place back in February, I realize I really need to catch my blog up to my social media. That is, I need to catch my blog up to real time. In order to do so, I’m going to start putting all the videos on a single trip into one blog entry instead of parsing each day’s vlog out into its own blog post. That means you’ll get a fast recap of my travels via YouTube starting…NOW. Day 1 in New York City Xi’an Famous

My second notable gastronomic adventure in Nashville was hot chicken. This Nashville stuff is so famous, even KFC released its own version. There are multiple Hattie B outposts, but my friend and I went to the centrally located one. You order at the counter and specify your preferred heat level—the brave can go all the way up the fire scale to “damn hot and, even hotter, “shut the cluck up.”” I went with medium while my Korean friend went with hot. Even the medium was pretty spicy, and I ended

I flew to Nashville to speak at a conference held at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, and in the Blind Cook fashion, I had to try some regional cuisine, namely southern cookin’ and hot chicken. The first adventure was at Arnold’s Country Kitchen in central Nashville. My friend and I arrived just in time to beat the lunch crowd. It’s one of those places serving what’s known as “meat-and-threes,” which is colloquial for meals consisting of a main meat entrée and three sides. (If you’ve never heard

On the heels of one of my trips to Vietnam, here’s another fun video from my YouTube where I do a true blind taste test. Last time, I tried snacks from various parts of Asia. This time, the hubs found a Korean market in Ho Chi Minh City and picked up a bunch of Korean snacks. I tasted each food item, tried to guess what it was, and gave my honest review. The Vietnamese are obsessed with Korean culture (likely due to the popularity of Korean dramas in Vietnam), and

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