Posts in Tag

soup

Following my trip to Danang where I had one of the best bowls of bun bo Hue at Ba Dieu, I’m going to share with you my recipe for this spicy lemongrass beef noodle soup, which I learned from my Aunt Carol. Bun bo Hue is one of my favorite Vietnamese noodle soups. Growing up, I loved it more than pho (but only if my mama made it less spicy for my sensitive tastebuds). The broth consists of boiled beef and pork bones with hints of lemongrass, fish sauce, shrimp

For most of my life, I didn’t care for hot pot;in my opinion, it was a dish in which too many things were going on, and yet they all soaked up the same, monotonous flavor from the boiling broth. That is, until I had Little Sheep Mongolian Hot Pot when it opened an outpost in Houston some years back. That was where I learned the broth is only half the game. Hot pot is also about the dipping sauce. Since then, hot pot has become a regular meal in our

Thanksgiving is done, but the leftovers are not. Because Thanksgiving is our favorite holiday (and with that comes the love of traditional Thanksgiving food), the hubs and I usually cook enough fowl to feed family, friends, and ourselves for days, even weeks. This year was no exception: we sous vide a turkey and fried two turkeys. We vacuum sealed most of the leftover turkey to make it last as long as possible in the fridge. (You can freeze the turkey leftovers too.)

The latest addition to my kitchen is this lovely bright orange 6.75-qt. Dutch (French) oven from Le Creuset. Le Creuset is a sponsor of my cooking show, Four Senses, and after being surrounded by their pretty cookware on set during season 2 production, I wanted a piece for myself. This is my first piece of Le Creuset. I’ve heard praises sung for their French ovens, so I was stoked to get one right in time for winter when stews and roasts rule the kitchen. I got mine in a bright

Your crazy family came and went. Now all that’s left is a big ol’ turkey carcass. Wait, don’t throw anything away just yet. In this time and age when offal eating has become the trend, I’m going to show you what you can do with all those leftover turkey bones. First, you make turkey stock. Duh! Then, you use that stock to make turkey congee. Every Asian country has its own version of rice porridge. It’s the ultimate Asian comfort food. Think of the Americans with their chicken noodle soup.

The second course of the Italian birthday dinner was this Tuscan potato soup which is very similar to Olive Garden‘s bottomless potato soup. I found the copycat recipe online years ago and have been making it since. It’s a little spicy (which you don’t expect), and the blend of vegetables, meat, and the creamyb chicken broth all make for a flavorful soup. Because it’s not too thick, it’s not super filling, and thus makes a proper second course for a four-course meal. But because it’s creamy, it’s still hearty enough

Did you know that as the weather cools, our bodies start craving comfort foods? I think there are two reasons for this. First of all, cooler weather reminds us of the holiday season (Thanksgiving and Christmas) where comfort foods are served. Secondly, our bodies experience a physiological change in external temperature, and hearty foods help our bodies warm back up. (Okay, so I pulled this last reason out of my butt, but I’m willing to bet there’s something to it.) So here is the first of many comfort recipes to

Since our wedding in May, our house has filled with nice things for cooking and dining. From now on, instead of agonizing over what gift to get, I’ve decided to utilize the new spiffy kitchenware and dinnerware and practice cooking at the same time by hosting dinner for friends in celebration of their birthdays. The first two lucky friends were Jade and Uyen (and their husbands), who happened to make up 1/3 of my bridal party. I don’t really know what I got myself into because Jade and Patrick are