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sides

The place I enjoyed eating at the most during this trip to Dallas was Madrina, and sadly, the restaurant has since closed. Regardless, I’m paying tribute to Madrina’s excellent Mexican fare with this recipe for elote, or grilled Mexican street corn. I served elote as a side dish to my Korean Wagyu beef taco at my recent pop-up with Ozone in Hong Kong, and it was a hit, especially with the bar’s head chef (who happens to be Brazilian). This colorful dish celebrates summer’s bounty; full of flavor yet well-balanced,

Following my trip to Syracuse and dinner at Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, and with it being deep into the summer season, I thought I’d post a recipe for baked beans. Side dishes are often overlooked at a barbecue feast, but you need those complementary accompaniments to provide variety and cut through the fatty richness of barbecued meats. Besides, I’ve posted before on how to make pork ribs and grilled chicken, so this time, I’m showing you a side instead. When I think of baked beans, I think of my elementary school cafeteria

What I noticed about my dining experiences at Avec, Blackbird, and Girl and the Goat was their common use of fresh, seasonal ingredients. Whether it’s fish or vegetables, the dishes are reflective of the time of year. The hubs and I have a friend who’s an avid fisher, and he gifted us this hybrid striped bass. There’s no better way to enjoy fresh seafood than to fire it up quickly on the pan with butter, salt, and cracked black pepper before giving it a squeeze of lemon prior to eating.

You just celebrated Easter, and that could very well mean you have a dozen-plus leftover eggs on your hands. Here’s a delicious yet simple recipe for onsen tamago, which translates from Japanese as “hot springs egg.” When I first visited Japan, a group of us went to Hakone and stayed in a hot springs inn near Mount Fuji. After taking the cable car to the top of a nearby mountain, we sat down in a cafe and ordered Fuji apples and onsen tamago. (Yeah, super creative, right?) The egg came

Inspired by my trip to Nashville, where I had tasty meals at both Arnold’s Country Kitchen and Hattie B’s Hot Chicken, here’s a recipe for mac ’n cheese. I had this dish at both restaurants—Arnold’s makes a pretty classic one, while Hattie B’s adds pimento cheese. Funny story: during one of my NMO attacks years ago, I was put on several days of intravenous corticosteroids, whose side effects include insomnia, water retention, and increased appetite. For days, all I craved was instant mac ’n cheese—you know, the kind that comes

It seems every city we visited in the UK and Ireland had a rendition of the good ol’, popular fish ’n chips. It’s no wonder, because the stuff is quick, easy, cheap, filling, and delicious. Fish ’n chips may be a British-born dish, but I grew up eating at Long John Silver’s, which has a similar offering of fried seafood and fried potatoes (called “fries” in the U.S. And “chips” in the UK and Ireland—and in case you are wondering, what Americans call “chips” are known as “crisps” over there).

As promised, I’m going to start posting recipes inspired by my travels, and I’m interrupting the L.A. series to bring you a recipe inspired by my visit to London. You might ask what does Indian have to do with London, but rumor has it London is home to some of the best Indian food in the world, even better than (gasp!) India itself. My theory behind this is similar to why I believe America has better pho than Vietnam: quite simply, the quality of ingredients are superior in the est.

Stuffing is one of those dishes with the most liberal of interpretations, depending on who makes it and what ingredients are used. Technically, what I make is not stuffing, but rather dressing. It’s not stuffing because it’s not stuffed in anything. (I never roast my bird, and frying a stuffed turkey would just be bad news.) But I like calling it “stuffing” anyway, because that word is just more fun to say than “dressing.” (Plus I always think of salad vinaigrettes when I hear “dressing.”) One of my earliest memories

I love corn and have to have it every Thanksgiving. It adds a nice crispy texture next to the creamy potatoes and casseroles. Back when I was an amateur cook, I used to serve them straight out of a can with some butter, salt, and pepper. Now I’ve graduated to cutting them off the cob and increasing the number of ingredients used.

When I think of American comfort food, I think of potatoes. I love potatoes in all forms: fried, baked, mashed, smashed, or whipped. What, you might ask, is the difference between mashed potatoes, smashed potatoes, and whipped potatoes? After digging around online, I’ve come up with this answer.

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