Posts in Tag

quick & easy

The place I enjoyed eating at the most during this trip to Dallas was Madrina, and sadly, the restaurant has since closed. Regardless, I’m paying tribute to Madrina’s excellent Mexican fare with this recipe for elote, or grilled Mexican street corn. I served elote as a side dish to my Korean Wagyu beef taco at my recent pop-up with Ozone in Hong Kong, and it was a hit, especially with the bar’s head chef (who happens to be Brazilian). This colorful dish celebrates summer’s bounty; full of flavor yet well-balanced,

What I noticed about my dining experiences at Avec, Blackbird, and Girl and the Goat was their common use of fresh, seasonal ingredients. Whether it’s fish or vegetables, the dishes are reflective of the time of year. The hubs and I have a friend who’s an avid fisher, and he gifted us this hybrid striped bass. There’s no better way to enjoy fresh seafood than to fire it up quickly on the pan with butter, salt, and cracked black pepper before giving it a squeeze of lemon prior to eating.

You just celebrated Easter, and that could very well mean you have a dozen-plus leftover eggs on your hands. Here’s a delicious yet simple recipe for onsen tamago, which translates from Japanese as “hot springs egg.” When I first visited Japan, a group of us went to Hakone and stayed in a hot springs inn near Mount Fuji. After taking the cable car to the top of a nearby mountain, we sat down in a cafe and ordered Fuji apples and onsen tamago. (Yeah, super creative, right?) The egg came

During my Narita layover, I stopped by a convenience store to pick up some onigiri, which is my favorite Japanese snack ever. It’s essentially a stuffed rice ball wrapped in crispy sheets of seaweed. My favorites are from the 7-11 or Family Mart and contain spicy tuna or tuna with mayo as the filling. You may also find teriyaki beef or plum or whatever, but I love the tuna ones best. In Hawaii, there is a similar rice ball called musubi and, in classic Hawaiian tradition, it’s stuffed with a

When I’m feeling fancy, I like to call this “fish sauce vinaigrette” or even “anchovy vinaigrette.” Essentially, it’s the vital finishing touch on scores of Vietnamese dishes. It can be used as a dipping sauce, a condiment, or a dressing. If you know how to make this one recipe, you’ll have the key to unlock an arsenal of Vietnamese dishes. The Vietnamese name for this sauce is nuoc mam cham—“nuoc mam” referring to the fish sauce and “cham” meaning “to dip.” I’m showing you this recipe as a prelude to

For most of my life, I didn’t care for hot pot;in my opinion, it was a dish in which too many things were going on, and yet they all soaked up the same, monotonous flavor from the boiling broth. That is, until I had Little Sheep Mongolian Hot Pot when it opened an outpost in Houston some years back. That was where I learned the broth is only half the game. Hot pot is also about the dipping sauce. Since then, hot pot has become a regular meal in our

I’m not a celebrant of Valentine’s Day, since I think it’s mostly an unnecessary jaunt through over-consumerism, but tomorrow is the hubs’s birthday, so I thought I’d honor him with a recipe for one of his favorite foods. The hubs loves a good burger. In Houston, our current favorite burger joint is Stanton’s City Bites, but why not make it at home yourself? I grew up eating McDonald’s, and even though fast food, especially those Golden Arches, spurs such contempt in our current health-conscious generation, I can’t deny I still

Translated from Korean as “mixed rice,” bibimbap is the dish I recall eating on my first morning in Seoul, Korea. It was at the counter of a food court stall, and although bibimbap is nothing fancy, there’s something comforting about the one-bowl meal, especially when it is served in a sizzling stone bowl. Although I didn’t eat bibimbap during my last trip to L.A., I wanted to pay tribute to Korean cuisine since I did eat a lot of that. Bibimbap is a quick and easy recipe that’s flavorful yet

We have a friend who loves to fish. I mean, he’s one serious fisherman. He drives to our neighboring state of Louisiana on the weekends to go deep-sea fishing. He went halfsies on a boat with his dad so they could take fishing trips together. He’s getting married this summer, and for his bachelor trip, he’s going to Costa Rica on—you guessed it—a fishing trip. (I’ve been told by the hubs there are other activities on the agenda, but we’ll see what really happens when you put the old man

Thanksgiving is done, but the leftovers are not. Because Thanksgiving is our favorite holiday (and with that comes the love of traditional Thanksgiving food), the hubs and I usually cook enough fowl to feed family, friends, and ourselves for days, even weeks. This year was no exception: we sous vide a turkey and fried two turkeys. We vacuum sealed most of the leftover turkey to make it last as long as possible in the fridge. (You can freeze the turkey leftovers too.)

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