Posts in Tag

my 2 cents

Because I was born and raised in America, when I meet Vietnamese elders, they are often surprised that: (1) I can speak Vietnamese, and (2) I not only can eat, but love to eat, Vietnamese food. Then when I say I even love mam tom and mam nem, they are shocked. This is because mam tom and mam nem are the stinkiest of stinky sauces. If you thought nuoc mam, or fish sauce, was bad, wait till you get a whiff of this purple stuff! Truthfully, I love these pungent

Bun bo Hue is one of my favorite Vietnamese noodle soups of all time. The broth consists of beef, pork, lemongrass, chiles, and shrimp paste, making it a balance of sweet, sour, savory, and spicy. It’s amazing! We hung out with Summer of Danang Cuisine, and the first of two meals we had together was this noodle soup at Bun Bo Hue Ba Dieu. The shop tends to close on a whim if the pot’s run dry, so I was relieved when we arrived shortly after sunset, and they said

There are two, maybe three, dishes you definitely need to try in Hoi An: cao lau Madame Khanh’s banh mi mi Quang (optional) Cao lau Cao lau literally translates as “high floor.” Legend has it that back in the day when Hoi An was colonized by the French, those with money ate on the higher floors, and this dried noodle dish, full of fresh herbs and greens, was popular for its light, refreshing flavors. Today, tradition continues, and to eat this dish, you have to climb up to the restaurant’s

There is a word in Vietnamese, nhau, that describes the act of getting together, drinking beer or spirits, and eating. To nhau is to partake in an age-old Vietnamese tradition where men gather to primarily socialize and drink, and secondarily eat foods that are mostly small bar bites, often exotic (think goat, snails, duck tongues, chicken tails (aka butts). Now in modern times, women also nhau, although not as frequently—go to any nhau establishment, and you’ll mostly find groups of men. I’m always one to break tradition, so I personally

The banh xeo (which translates into English as “sizzling crêpe”) at Ba Duong in Danang was one of my most memorable meals in Vietnam. Lena T., my food guide for Danang, showed us the proper way to eat Madame Duong’s banh xeo, which is to wrap a portion with some nem nuong (grilled pork sausage) and fresh veg in rice paper, and then dip the roll in the “miracle sauce” (as dubbed by locals, according to Lena). The sauce reminds me of the addicting accompaniment to nem nuong rolls from

Ben Thanh Market (or <em>Cho Ben Thanh</em> in Vietnamese) is perhaps the most famous market in Ho Chi Minh City. Its central location in District 1 makes it accessible to many of the hotels and other tourist destinations.  During the day, vendors sell souvenir t-shirts, cell phone cases, kitchenware, fabric, fruits, sugar cane juice, durian smoothies, and (my favorite)

While there is so much more to today’s landscape of Ho Chi Minh City, for many foreigners, the Lunch Lady experience is still the quintessence of Vietnam food culture. I talk about the Lunch Lady a lot, but that’s because I like her noodle soups a lot. She cooks up a different noodle soup every day of the week, and although I haven’t had every single one of her noodle soups, the four or five different bowls I’ve had were all delicious. She’s only open for a few hours mid-day,

When in Tennessee, you just gotta eat some southern cookin’. It’s good for the soul. We ventured here the evening we got in to Knoxville because I’d heard Market Square was a pretty cool town center worth checking out. Indeed, there were a lot of people milling around, drinking and chatting at patio bars and sidewalk cafes, street artists, even a Shakespeare play being performed. We walked in to Tupelo Honey Cafe, where the host said it would be almost a two-hour wait. “What about the bar?” the hubs asks.

I’ve waxed poetic about the banh mi thit—Vietnamese for meat sandwich (in this case, cold cuts)—from Banh Mi Huynh Hoa before, and now it’s time to talk about it again. I believe the quality of the bread is a huge factor in the overall quality of the sandwich. Huynh Hoa’s bread is pillowy on the inside, crusty on the outside, and just tastes, well, like good bread. The pâté is generous, and the cold cuts have more depth of flavor than the many I’ve had in the U.S. When I

This is my pops’s favorite place for bun thit nuong cha gio in Saigon. For those of you who are not familiar: bun = rice vermicelli thit = meat, usually refers to pork when used without a modifier nuong = grilled cha gio = fried spring rolls You may not know it by its Vietnamese name, but you may have had the dried noodle bowl before, as it’s a pretty popular Vietnamese dish and one new converts to the cuisine tend to taste first with their virgin tongues (the other

1 2 3 10 Page 1 of 10