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Korean

Following my L.A. Visit when I spent a lot of meals in Koreatown, I thought I’d share a Korean comfort food favorite: kim chi fried rice! And to make it even better, I cook it with Spam. Now I know not everyone is into the luncheon meat in a can, but did you know that in Korea, Spam is a prized food? It’s relatively expensive, and there exists such a thing as the Spam gift basket.. The photo above of my fried rice doesn’t actually have any kim chi in

Blood sausage. It sounds gross, but it’s delicious. Many cultures have a version, from the English black pudding to the Cajun boudin. Koreans have their own blood sausage, too, called soondae. The Korean version is chewy thanks to the inclusion of sweet potato noodles. The first time I tried soondae at a Korean grocery store’s food court in Houston, I thought it was just okay: nothing special, a little dry. Then I had it in Dallas from a little Korean deli. I dipped it in the salt, which enhanced the

Bossam is one of my favorite Korean dishes. I don’t get to eat it often, so it’s always a special occasion when I do get it. Bossam consists of tucking pork belly and usually a thin slice of sweet pickled radish or even kim chi into a lettuce leaf or a thin sheet of rice cake, and then dipping it in either sesame oil with salt and pepper or doenjang, fermented soybean paste (my personal prefernce). One of my earliest memories having bossam was in Seoul—after a long night of

There are multiple locations of Ham Ji Park: one on W. 6th Street, one on W. Pico Boulevard, and one in Buena Park. The hubs and I were told to go here for gamja tang, a comforting Korean pork neck and potato stew. This stew is one of the hubs’s favorite—he says it’s best after a night of drinking soju. But this time, since the in-laws joined us in L.A., instead of a late-night snack, we had the gamja tang for early dinner. The stew was very good, but I’ve

My in-laws love visiting L.A. because they feel right at home in Koreatown—you can virtually get by with only speaking Korean. Day 1 in Los Angeles Ham Ji Park Griffith Observatory For lunch, we hit up Ham Ji Park, which was recommended by a friend for their gamja tang, a Korean pork neck and potato stew usually consumed late night after much soju. After lunch, the mama-in-law wants to shop for Korean ingredients—red pepper flakes for making kim chi, to be exact—so we wander over to a Korean food boutique

I’ve been to Baekjeong in L.A., but since my cousin who lives in New York had never been to either, we decided to dine here for dinner. The hubs and I were still pretty stuffed from our lunch at Pok Pok, but we couldn’t help ourselves and over-ordered. In addition to the usual beef combo consisting of short ribs (galbi), ribeye, and flank steak, we also ordered the beef tartare and “lunchbox,” which is basically your kim chi fried rice shaken up in a box before served. The meat is

Countdown to Super Bowl LI in my lovely (and underrated) hometown of Houston! Earlier this week, I shared one of my favorite ways to make chicken wings. Today, I’m sharing the hubs’s preferred recipe, made with gochujang, or Korean spicy red pepper paste. If you’ve ever had Korean food, you’re probably familiar with this paste and condiment—it’s the same stuff used to dress bibimbap, or Korean mixed rice bowls, and it’s made into marinades and dipping sauces. The flavor of gochujang is sweet, tangy, a little funky, a little spicy.

On the heels of one of my trips to Vietnam, here’s another fun video from my YouTube where I do a true blind taste test. Last time, I tried snacks from various parts of Asia. This time, the hubs found a Korean market in Ho Chi Minh City and picked up a bunch of Korean snacks. I tasted each food item, tried to guess what it was, and gave my honest review. The Vietnamese are obsessed with Korean culture (likely due to the popularity of Korean dramas in Vietnam), and

Since today is Leap Day, I’ve invited the hubs to guest blog. Leap Day tradition has genders switching roles for 24 hours—for example, women are supposed to propose to men on February 29th—but my idea of an exciting switch-up is to have John post instead. “You can post whatever you want: a rant, a review, or random thoughts,” was my parameter for his post. Being married to a cook (and being a very good cook himself), the hubs chose to write a recipe. Introducing John Suh, aka the hubs. ***

Translated from Korean as “mixed rice,” bibimbap is the dish I recall eating on my first morning in Seoul, Korea. It was at the counter of a food court stall, and although bibimbap is nothing fancy, there’s something comforting about the one-bowl meal, especially when it is served in a sizzling stone bowl. Although I didn’t eat bibimbap during my last trip to L.A., I wanted to pay tribute to Korean cuisine since I did eat a lot of that. Bibimbap is a quick and easy recipe that’s flavorful yet

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