Posts in Tag

desserts

Dominique Ansel is best known for his original cronet, which was a portmanteau of a croissant and donut. On this trip to New York, I had a meeting not too far from his eponymous bakery, and so I decided to try my luck at getting a cronut afterwards. We arrived at the bakery around 10:30 on a Friday morning and breathed a sigh of relief when the queue was short. Sadly, though, when it was our turn, the cronut had already sold out. We opted for a frozen s’more instead,

David Chang’s Momofuku is an empire. And the Momofuku Milk Bar, in my opinion, is the crown jewel of that empire. Now, I’m not even a desserts gal, but Milk Bar does some crazy-creative stuff with sweets, and they’re delicious. While the crack pie (think cookie dough with oats and sugar and salt to the nth degree) is perhaps Milk Bar’s most popular dessert, I much prefer the corn cookie (hint: must love corn). One thing I can agree on, however, is the cereal milk. Imagine drinking the milk after

During my trip to Vietnam, I did a fan meet-up at iKem, the only shop in Vietnam making ice cream using liquid nitrogen. My cousins started the business and invited me to create some of the in-store flavors. I designed two: honey lavender (the recipe can be found in my cookbook) and matcha green tea. iKem appeals to children and teenagers because of the novel liquid nitrogen process. The fact that ice cream is frozen amidst a cloud of billowing smoke makes it Instagram-Worthy, and nowadays, that seems to be

Happy Halloween! ’Tis the season of everything pumpkin: pumpkin bread, pumpkin pie, and pumpkin lattes. Here’s a little something different for you this Halloween. Check out the persimmon. Translated in Latin as “fruit of the gods,” persimmon is widely popular among East Asians, particularly the Japanese, Korean, Chinese, and Vietnamese. My mama loved persimmon—I recall boxes of them piled up on our dining table growing up whenever they’re in season (which is now). My in-laws also love persimmon. They pick fresh persimmon in the fall, eat them raw, and dry

The first time I came to London, I was 22, fresh out of college, and traveling on a young backpacker’s dime. This meant I ate a lot of hostel breakfasts and fast food. I was later told London is home to the best restaurants in the UK, and now that I have a little more money in the bank, I was able to splurge on food beyond cold cereal and Big Macs (which, if I recall correctly, tasted just like their American counterparts). On day 1 of our UK &

The temperature in Houston is reaching the 100s this week, and the only way many of us can bear the wet heat is to think of all the other great things Houston has to offer, like food,. food, and more food. I won’t complain, though—I’d been to so many cold places in the last couple of winters (I.e. Grand Rapids, Michigan, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Toronto when it was -10°F!), that I promised Houston I wouldn’t complain about its summers this year. At the end of the day, I would rather

My mama-in-law likes to gift us Asian pears. They are large and juicy with sweet, crispy flesh. I’ve made them into pear, blueberry, and banana juice, and we’ve eaten many of them purely sliced as a snack. But they are quite sizable, so we often can’t go through them as quickly as we receive them. I don’t like to waste food, so poaching them allows me to prolong their refrigerator shelf life and, more selfishly, my own enjoyment of their unique succulence.

I’ve been writing a lot lately about healthy living, but as I’m a firm believer in the saying, “everything in moderation,” here’s a nice, fatty post for you this week. The best ice cream I’ve ever had was in San Francisco. Let me preface this by saying gelato is different from ice cream—in a nutshell, gelato has less fat and churns at alower speed, thus has less air incorporated into it (read the more in-depth explanation of ice cream vs. gelato from Serious Eats)—and I’ve definitely had some amazing gelato

At the beginning of summer, I’d cooked a special farewell lunch for my grad program friends: Cajun stuffed Cornish hens, dirty rice, and Brussels sprouts with candied bacon. For dessert, I kept with the Louisianan theme and served homemade beignets and Cafe du Monde New Orleans-style coffee with condensed milk, just the way Vietnamese people love to drink it. While I grew up around Cafe du Monde’s ready-to-brew coffee grounds (which came in those notorious mustard yellow tin cans that afterwards became every Vietnamese family’s piggy bank/knickknack holder), I didn’t

My childhood best friend got married last month in Montery, and it was an opportunity for me to revisit the lovely Bay area. It would be John’s first time to northern California so naturally, we made a list of all the things we wanted to see and do. You would think our list included the Golden Gate Bridge, Lombard Street, Fisherman’s Wharf, Ghirardelli Square, Alcatraz, or riding a true cable car. But no, being the foodaphiles we are, we saw none of those. Each day was about getting from one

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