Posts in Tag

appetizers

Our family celebrates Christmas, and that’s less than a couple of weeks away. My, how time flies. Following the likes of my post on our Thanksgiving menu last month, I thought I’d share with you what I’ll be making in our kitchen for this year’s Christmas dinner. Since the hubs and I hosted his family for Thanksgiving and cooked quite the elaborate Thanksgiving meal, we’ve decided to let my in-laws host our small family Christmas gathering this year. His mama-in-law knows her way around a Korean kitchen, so I’m looking

You just celebrated Easter, and that could very well mean you have a dozen-plus leftover eggs on your hands. Here’s a delicious yet simple recipe for onsen tamago, which translates from Japanese as “hot springs egg.” When I first visited Japan, a group of us went to Hakone and stayed in a hot springs inn near Mount Fuji. After taking the cable car to the top of a nearby mountain, we sat down in a cafe and ordered Fuji apples and onsen tamago. (Yeah, super creative, right?) The egg came

Countdown to Super Bowl LI in my lovely (and underrated) hometown of Houston! Earlier this week, I shared one of my favorite ways to make chicken wings. Today, I’m sharing the hubs’s preferred recipe, made with gochujang, or Korean spicy red pepper paste. If you’ve ever had Korean food, you’re probably familiar with this paste and condiment—it’s the same stuff used to dress bibimbap, or Korean mixed rice bowls, and it’s made into marinades and dipping sauces. The flavor of gochujang is sweet, tangy, a little funky, a little spicy.

Two big celebrations going down this week! First, it was Tet, or Vietnamese New Year, then this Sunday, it’s the Super Bowl in Houston! Even though the Houston Texans got eliminated during play-offs, I’m looking forward to the game since it’ll be in my hometown of Houston, which means lots of celeb sightings and exciting events going on around town. Today, I’m sharing with you a great Super Bowl recipe, except it’s with a fresh, umami twist. Chicken wings have long been a football game favorite, but instead of serving

During my Narita layover, I stopped by a convenience store to pick up some onigiri, which is my favorite Japanese snack ever. It’s essentially a stuffed rice ball wrapped in crispy sheets of seaweed. My favorites are from the 7-11 or Family Mart and contain spicy tuna or tuna with mayo as the filling. You may also find teriyaki beef or plum or whatever, but I love the tuna ones best. In Hawaii, there is a similar rice ball called musubi and, in classic Hawaiian tradition, it’s stuffed with a

I was told by a couple of Taiwanese-American friends that Yong Kang Beef Noodle served some of the best beef noodle soup in Taipei. In the evening after I gave my TEDxTaipei Talk, I rewarded myself with a trip to Yong Kang. I think the first time I ever tasted Taiwanese-style beef noodle soup was at Sanding in Houston. The broth is aromatic with remnants of five-spice, which typically consists of star anise, cloves, cinnamon, fennel seeds, and peppercorns. In a typical bowl, you’ll find beef (duh), bon choy, medium-width

Since today is Leap Day, I’ve invited the hubs to guest blog. Leap Day tradition has genders switching roles for 24 hours—for example, women are supposed to propose to men on February 29th—but my idea of an exciting switch-up is to have John post instead. “You can post whatever you want: a rant, a review, or random thoughts,” was my parameter for his post. Being married to a cook (and being a very good cook himself), the hubs chose to write a recipe. Introducing John Suh, aka the hubs. ***

Last week, I posted a video about my menu for the Ikea Supper Club: five courses of small offerings that reflected both my heritage and upbringing. A month has gone by since the Supper Club, and I still reflect upon the menu fondly. The guests seemed to thoroughly enjoy the dishes (or at least that’s what they told me), and when asked which was their favorite, a majority said it was the sous vide pork belly bao.

It’s August, and that means it’s the dead middle of the dog days of summer. So what do you do with these dog days? You eat cold fish, that’s what. And not just cold fish but raw fish. In a recent “MasterChef” episode, Felix lovingly assigned me a beautiful whole salmon. Salmon is one of those fish that I love to eat raw but can’t stand cooked. In the form of sushi or sashimi, I gobble it up. Even smoked, I’ll throw it on some bread with cheese and herbs.

A classic antipasto italiano–Italian Appetizer–is bruschetta, pronounced with a short “u” as in “brush” and a hard “ch” sound like a “k” as in “basket”. Many Americans incorrectly use a long “u” and a soft “shh” sound, and while this is acceptable in most English speaking countries, I like to use the authentic Italian version, complete with rolling R’s and gusto. Now that we’ve got the pronunciation stuff out of the way, let’s move on to the dish itself. I recently hosted another birthday dinner for friends Joy, Joanna, Heari,

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