Back to our regularly scheduled programming… In continuing my gastronomic adventures in New York, let’s talk about Brooklyn. It was my third venture down into this borough and the hubs’s first. We were looking forward to the brief escape from crowded Manhattan and decided to lunch at Pok Pok, a Portland-based restaurant serving up northern Thai-style food. Perhaps their most famous dish is the Vietnamese fish sauce chicken wings ($16), though I’ve tried them twice and, while they’re great, I think my caramelized fish sauce wings are superior. (The hubs

Countdown to Super Bowl LI in my lovely (and underrated) hometown of Houston! Earlier this week, I shared one of my favorite ways to make chicken wings. Today, I’m sharing the hubs’s preferred recipe, made with gochujang, or Korean spicy red pepper paste. If you’ve ever had Korean food, you’re probably familiar with this paste and condiment—it’s the same stuff used to dress bibimbap, or Korean mixed rice bowls, and it’s made into marinades and dipping sauces. The flavor of gochujang is sweet, tangy, a little funky, a little spicy.

Two big celebrations going down this week! First, it was Tet, or Vietnamese New Year, then this Sunday, it’s the Super Bowl in Houston! Even though the Houston Texans got eliminated during play-offs, I’m looking forward to the game since it’ll be in my hometown of Houston, which means lots of celeb sightings and exciting events going on around town. Today, I’m sharing with you a great Super Bowl recipe, except it’s with a fresh, umami twist. Chicken wings have long been a football game favorite, but instead of serving

This Saturday, January 28, is the lunar new year, so an early chuc mung nam moi to you! We are saying goodbye to the year of the monkey and hello to the rooster. People born under this zodiac sign tend to be punctual, honest, bright, ambitious, and self-reliant. However, they can also be fickle, critical, impatient, and selfish. You are a rooster if you’re born in 1921, 1933, 1945, 1957, 1969, 1981, 1993, 2005, or 2017. Do you know any roosters, and do they fit the above qualities? Anyway, with

I started my YouTube channel almost five years ago, but it really wasn’t until last year that the hubs and I began pushing out content regularly. As an answer to a question I frequently get on my YouTube, I decided the first video to be released on my channel in 2017 would show how I cook without sight. MasterChef winner Christine Ha shows how the Blind cook got quite a lot of views and shares, and I’m proud to say it’s a well-done video for an amateur two-person production crew.

Coming up in two weeks, I’ll be returning to New York for a brain-stimulating conversation with neuroscientist and Johns Hopkins University professor David Linden at the Rubin Museum of Art. In its tenth season, the museum’s Brainwave series will explore the idea of perception. On February 3, Linden and I will discuss how perception extends beyond the visual, and how I developed my palate and cook without sight. Following our conversation, we’ll both be signing our respective books. If you’re in the area on February 3rd, please join us at

Call me boring, but my standard for xiaolongbao, or soup dumplings, is the ones from Joe’s Shanghai in New York. I’ve had excellent xiaolongbao in Vancouver, too, and of course, the best ones were probably those from Din Tai Fung in Taipei, but Joe Shanghai makes the most consistently tasty ones out of those I’ve had stateside. So when I had friends rave about the soup dumplings at Shanghai Cafe, I had to give them a try. We stopped in mid-afternoon on a Friday and were seated immediately. The place

Dominique Ansel is best known for his original cronet, which was a portmanteau of a croissant and donut. On this trip to New York, I had a meeting not too far from his eponymous bakery, and so I decided to try my luck at getting a cronut afterwards. We arrived at the bakery around 10:30 on a Friday morning and breathed a sigh of relief when the queue was short. Sadly, though, when it was our turn, the cronut had already sold out. We opted for a frozen s’more instead,

After imbibing at Please Don’t Tell, the hubs and I parted ways with our friends and wandered down the street looking for a bite to eat. We stumbled upon this yakitori-izakaya type. It looked crowded without a horrendous wait, so we decided to step in and give it a try. After about a five-minute wait, we were escorted to a table towards the back. Oh! Taisho seems like your straightforward Japanese snack and socializing kind of place. Service is quick and just friendly enough to warrant no complaints, but it’s

I’ve been trying to get into Please Don’t Tell (or PDT for short) since 2013. It seems like every time we make plans for it, we couldn’t get reservations. Yes, it’s just a cocktail bar, but it’s one of the first modern speakeasies that I’d heard of, and the fact that you have to enter the bar through a telephone booth inside a hot dog shop makes its charm quite attractive to both locals and tourists and, thus, difficult to get into. Speaking of reservations, to get one, the phone

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