Ever since my visit to San Diego where I gave a TEDx talk at UCSD, I’ve been involved with Aira, a start-up that uses smart glasses to connect blind and low vision users to live human agents for visual and navigational assistance. The above YouTube video shows me using Aira technology for the first time last year. Like the pace of most successful technology companies, Aira has grown immensely and exponentially every year since I first met Sumon the CEO in 2015. Now, Aira has partnered with AT&T for the

My last visit to San Diego was first and foremost to meet with Aira, a start-up service enabling the blind and vision impaired to navigate the world more independently. But more on Aira later. Let’s talk about what else I did in San Diego. Day 1 in San Diego La Puerta Juniper & Ivy We arrive in San Diego and walk to a nearby restaurant, La Puerta, to catch happy hour. The hubs and I order local craft beers on draft and some tacos and guacamole to share. Then later

Next weekend in Houston, on the evenings of October 7th and 8th, I’ll be collaborating with Alvin Schultz also of MasterChef fame. Alvin does these highly creative Underground dinners which consist of a multi-course tasting menu with some of the most unique dishes I’ve ever had. A perfect example is the above video which documents the hubs and me attending Alvin’s Pulp Fiction themed Underground dinner. Pulp Fiction is one of my favorite movies, and it’s Alvin’s, too, so this dinner was loads of fun, both for him to create

I’m excited to announce a culinary collaboration with Alvin Schultz, a contestant on MasterChef season 2. Alvin also resides in Houston, so we became fast friends when I tweeted him back in 2012 that I’d be on season 3. Alvin has been doing these cool Underground dinners—think of them like the Supper Club I did for Ikea Sweden where you dine on a multi-course meal in an intimate undisclosed setting with potential strangers-turned-friends. I’ve been to one of Alvin’s Underground dinners before and have eaten his food plenty of times,

I can’t believe it’s been five years since my own season of MasterChef! Last night, the show’s eighth season crowned their new American MasterChef on FOX. Although I haven’t really followed an entire season since season 4, I tuned in near the end of last night’s finale. Congratulations, Dino! And Ebony and Jason, you were amazing, too. Ebony, I admire your grit, and Jason, your finale meal is the one I’d most want to eat. To commemorate my victory anniversary, the hubs and I released Five years after MasterChef: Q&A

Following my L.A. Visit when I spent a lot of meals in Koreatown, I thought I’d share a Korean comfort food favorite: kim chi fried rice! And to make it even better, I cook it with Spam. Now I know not everyone is into the luncheon meat in a can, but did you know that in Korea, Spam is a prized food? It’s relatively expensive, and there exists such a thing as the Spam gift basket.. The photo above of my fried rice doesn’t actually have any kim chi in

Blood sausage. It sounds gross, but it’s delicious. Many cultures have a version, from the English black pudding to the Cajun boudin. Koreans have their own blood sausage, too, called soondae. The Korean version is chewy thanks to the inclusion of sweet potato noodles. The first time I tried soondae at a Korean grocery store’s food court in Houston, I thought it was just okay: nothing special, a little dry. Then I had it in Dallas from a little Korean deli. I dipped it in the salt, which enhanced the

Bossam is one of my favorite Korean dishes. I don’t get to eat it often, so it’s always a special occasion when I do get it. Bossam consists of tucking pork belly and usually a thin slice of sweet pickled radish or even kim chi into a lettuce leaf or a thin sheet of rice cake, and then dipping it in either sesame oil with salt and pepper or doenjang, fermented soybean paste (my personal prefernce). One of my earliest memories having bossam was in Seoul—after a long night of

There are multiple locations of Ham Ji Park: one on W. 6th Street, one on W. Pico Boulevard, and one in Buena Park. The hubs and I were told to go here for gamja tang, a comforting Korean pork neck and potato stew. This stew is one of the hubs’s favorite—he says it’s best after a night of drinking soju. But this time, since the in-laws joined us in L.A., instead of a late-night snack, we had the gamja tang for early dinner. The stew was very good, but I’ve

My in-laws love visiting L.A. because they feel right at home in Koreatown—you can virtually get by with only speaking Korean. Day 1 in Los Angeles Ham Ji Park Griffith Observatory For lunch, we hit up Ham Ji Park, which was recommended by a friend for their gamja tang, a Korean pork neck and potato stew usually consumed late night after much soju. After lunch, the mama-in-law wants to shop for Korean ingredients—red pepper flakes for making kim chi, to be exact—so we wander over to a Korean food boutique

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