Posts in Category

Read it. Watch it.

We enjoyed our Danang food tour with Lena T. so much that we invited her back the next day to hang out in Hoi An. We rented motorbikes again and rode all the way from Danang to Hoi An, which was about a 45-minute drive—not bad, except that your back and butt will hurt by the end. I had a lot of expectations for Hoi An since I’ve had two friends tell me on separate occasions that it was their favorite town in Vietnam. My pops described the old town,

For a quick getaway, the hubs, BIL, and I took a weekend trip to Danang, a relaxing beach town in the central region of Vietnam, where the streets are less crowded, the air breezier—a welcomed change to the sticky, saturated streets of Saigon. We hit up the beach in the morning, located right across the street from our hotel. Because most Vietnamese people prefer to be out of the sun (fairer skin indicates higher social status, as in you’re wealthy enough to not farm the fields yourself), we pretty much

YouTuber Kyle Le was the official winner of my Saigon food guide contest, but I couldn’t resist reaching out to another couple who had submitted an entry video. Pinky and Chuck (their self-selected English names) are a young, vibrant couple, and the hubs, the BIL, and I spent an afternoon snacking around HCMC with them. Pinky and Chuck took us to eat banh xeo (turmeric and coconut crêpe typically stuffed with pork, shrimp, and bean sprouts), goi con (summer rolls), and a snack shop serving small bites often frequented by

It was my bro-in-law’s first time to Vietnam, so naturally, I took him to the Lunch Lady so he could have the quintessential Vietnam street food experience. Both he and the hubs loved the noodle soup, which happened that day to be bun Thai—Thai-style rice vermicelli with seafood. As a first-timer, the BIL was also taken to Ben Thanh Market where cheap goods abound. It’s not my favorite place, but it’s usually a must-see for first-time visitors. The BIL loves noodle soups, so that evening, we have it again; except

Before coming to Vietnam, I ran a contest for a food guide in Ho Chi Minh City, and the winner was Kyle Le, a Vietnamese-American YouTuber now living in HCMC. As expected, we did a lot of food-hopping, from chao via (duck congee) to banh con (steamed rice rolls, which I should add is John’s favorite Vietnamese dish) to (cuc chien bo (butter-fried quail). For the record, the duck congee with offal was excellent, the rice rolls were pretty fantastic, and the quail was decent, except for the fact that

Last month on my mama’s birthday, I posted my first Food From Home mini film, which featured my mama’s cha gio. Today, I’m sharing another Food Talkies “Food From Home” film; this time, it’s about bun rieu—a Vietnamese crab and rice vermicelli soup. In case you missed it, “Food From Home” is a new mini-docu film collection that captures personal food stories. As I mention in the film, bun rieu was not my favorite noodle soup growing up, but I developed a fondness for it as I got older and

On August 23rd, the #HowEyeSeeIt campaign launched, challenging those with vision to attempt a task or activity they enjoy while blindfolded. “” target=”_blank”I shot a video with Chef Tim Love doing the blindfold challenge at his restaurant, “” target=”_blank”Lonesome Dove, in Knoxville. I must say he was actually pretty good at cooking blind. The #HowEyeSeeIt is a campaign raising money to fight retinal diseases causing blindness on behalf of Foundation Fighting Blindness. The campaign runs until October 13th. Visit the #HowEyeSeeIt page to see how you can get involved, or

Second day in Saigon: food, signing my newly translated cookbook, and more food. Family lunch today had us venturing outside the house into the crazy crowded streets of Saigon. We dine at a well-known rice vermicelli restaurant, and I pick up some bad-ass banh mi for afternoon snacking at home. Besides pho, I’d say bun thit nuong and banh mi thit are the most well-known dishes in Vietnamese cuisine–they’re what people try when first being introduced to Vietnamese food. Growing up, grilled pork was more often eaten with broken rice

Our first meal in Saigon was a home-cooked bowl of mi Quang, a specialty noodle dish from the Quang Nam province of central Vietnam. Mi Quang can consist of many different ingredients, but the common factors are noodles and turmeric. You can have shrimp, pork, chicken, or all of the above and then some, in your bowl of mi Quang. Dessert in Vietnam (and throughout Asia) often consists of fruit. I tried a fruit I’d never had before: vu sua, which translates into English as “breast milk” [pause for inappropriate,

In December, the hubs and I flew to Vietnam to work on a marketing campaign for the gourmet American-style popcorn, Uncle Jax. We got to fly Japan Airlines business class—it’s always a major bonus to fly business. The food is better, and you often get a three to five course meal service. (Five courses, in classic French tradition, consist of appetizer, salad, main, cheese, and dessert.) Plus there’s all-you-can-drink alcoholic beverages, of which I used to take advantage until I became a seasoned traveler and began to value rest over

1 2 3 10 Page 1 of 10