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Eat it.

When I tell Canadians some of my favorite raw oysters to consume are the Kumamoto oyster—hailing from the West coast but originally from Japan, mildly briny, moderately sweet, medium in size—they gasp and say, “Oh no…Prince Edward Island oysters are the best!” I believe in equal opportunity. I love all oysters, even those fat, briny Gulf Coast oysters poo-pooed by so many. (Hey, don’t knock my third coast!) Anywhere I go, if the region is known for oysters, I’ll most likely be slurping down a few. (Okay, maybe more than

Recently, it was announced that my cooking show, Four Senses, would be entering its fourth season of production on AMI! To celebrate the milestone, I’m taking the next few weeks to reminisce on our friendly northern neighbor, Canada. Back in 2014, we were shooting our second season. One of the first meals I had on my return to Canada was tonkotsu ramen at Sansotei Ramen in downtown Toronto. Being from Houston where there are not a lot of Japanese, I tend to seek this cuisine when traveling to places with

While filming MasterChef Vietnam season 3, I met some folks from the Singapore Tourism Board; their job was to help the producers obtain permits for on-site shoots and make sure things ran smoothly during filming. As we were wrapping our first day’s shoot, Glenn and Junnie invited me to dinner to try some traditional Singaporean dishes. Of course, I said yes. How could I resist? On my travels, I love discovering new foods through the tastebuds of locals. Everyone talks about chile crab or chicken with rice when they talk

I was in Singapore because we filmed a MasterChef Vietnam season 3 challenge there, and sadly, I only had less than 36 hours! This was my first time ever to this baby of a nation, and I was excited to try Singaporean food in actual Singapore. I’ve had their renowned cuisine in restaurants, and now I’d get to try the real thing. Because I was in Singapore for work, that meant I’d have even less leisure time…which meant less foods to try. Double-disappointment. As soon as I’d landed, though, I

You know those “where are they now?” segments on celebrity news shows and articles? I sort of did one when I visited MasterChef U.S. Season 4 winner Luca Manfé’s food truck, The Lucky Fig. (Or maybe Luca’s fans saw my YouTube episode and were like, “Oh, so that’s what that Christine from season 3 is doing now—making YouTube videos and eating…”) Either way, neither guesses are far from the truth. Luca was born in Italy, moved to New York, and was living there when I first met him during season

Dating back to 1913, Leo Burdock’s is the oldest fish ’n chips chain in Dublin. We stopped by one of the locations after our last night drinking in Dublin, because greasy fish ’n chips are what you crave after a night full of ”slainte! There was no line, the order and pickup were quick, the food was cheap, and we carried our goodies home wrapped up in butcher paper. Back at our airbnb, we spread open the paper on the dining table and went to town. The fish was fried

The Pig’s Ear is located at the top of a set of stairs. We stopped in for lunch because I’d wanted shepherd’s pie. The lunch menu is prix fixe, and you can choose between a two-course or a three-course option. I chose two, and I was satisfied afterwards, but I could have very well gone with the three-course selection. I was just excited to get my shepherd’s pie in Ireland. The lamb pie wasn’t gigantic, but its modest size still filled me up. Most importantly, it was pretty darn good.

Jameson is my favorite go-to whiskey. It’s smooth, sweet, and consistent. I like mine on a rock—that is, I like mine served with just one ice cube. It’s enough to mellow the whiskey out even more, but not enough to water it down. The hubs is a big Jameson fan, too. It was his call to stock the bar at our wedding with Jameson. My father gave him a bottle of 18-year-old Jameson for Christmas one year. We drank it lovingly. So of course, when in Dublin, we had to

I’ve already had Irish coffee first thing in the morning, the breakfast of champions, so why not continue the routine? When in Dublin… It’s a good idea to hit up the Guinness Storehouse early—we opted for mid-morning—as the place gets overrun by crowds after lunch. (Hours of operation are from 9:30 AM to 5 PM daily.) The Storehouse is built to resemble a pint glass, and after you pay an admission fee, you get a short tour (more like a brief introduction to Guinness and the founder, Arthur Guinness) and

It’s been a long while since my first pop-up restaurant in Houston almost three years ago. I’ve been traveling and working on other projects in television and public speaking. This year, though, I hope to focus on my own personal culinary goals, and that means…drumroll, please…developing my own restaurant concepts which I hope to open in the near future. I always get asked when I’m going to open my own restaurant, and the time finally feels right. Of course, we are in the very early development stages of it all,

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