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Eat it.

David Chang’s Momofuku is an empire. And the Momofuku Milk Bar, in my opinion, is the crown jewel of that empire. Now, I’m not even a desserts gal, but Milk Bar does some crazy-creative stuff with sweets, and they’re delicious. While the crack pie (think cookie dough with oats and sugar and salt to the nth degree) is perhaps Milk Bar’s most popular dessert, I much prefer the corn cookie (hint: must love corn). One thing I can agree on, however, is the cereal milk. Imagine drinking the milk after

This was my second time visiting Maharlika Filipino Moderna, which I recently learned is pronounced “mah-HAR-lee-kah” with an emphasis on the second syllable. Maharlika was where I tried my first cocktail with fish sauce back in 2013. I was nervous to try it at first, but my cousin pointed out I got fish sauce tattooed on me, I had to try it. Not being one to turn something down, I said yes, and it changed my life. Maharlika’s fish sauce michelada was proof fish sauce could be done in cocktails.

I first heard about Xi’an Famous Foods when Anthony Bourdain featured it on his former show. Once we landed in NYC, since we were in the area, the hubs, our friend, and I decided to stop in at Xi’an for lunch. The outpost we went to was in East Village and tiny, tiny. I’m talking there’s just a few tables lining one wall, a bar lining the other wall, and room down the middle for the queue that ostensibly fills up during meal time. There’s a boombox playing old school

My second notable gastronomic adventure in Nashville was hot chicken. This Nashville stuff is so famous, even KFC released its own version. There are multiple Hattie B outposts, but my friend and I went to the centrally located one. You order at the counter and specify your preferred heat level—the brave can go all the way up the fire scale to “damn hot and, even hotter, “shut the cluck up.”” I went with medium while my Korean friend went with hot. Even the medium was pretty spicy, and I ended

I flew to Nashville to speak at a conference held at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, and in the Blind Cook fashion, I had to try some regional cuisine, namely southern cookin’ and hot chicken. The first adventure was at Arnold’s Country Kitchen in central Nashville. My friend and I arrived just in time to beat the lunch crowd. It’s one of those places serving what’s known as “meat-and-threes,” which is colloquial for meals consisting of a main meat entrée and three sides. (If you’ve never heard

I’ve written about Cua Ba Chi before, but since it’s one of my favorite places to eat in Saigon, I’m dedicating today’s entire post to this very special crab stall. I first learned about this spot from my parents, who took us there for the hubs’s 30th birthday back in 2013. We’ve all since fallen in love with the cua rang me, or tamarind crab. Since it can be too sweet for my palate, I now request less sugar in the sauce, just like I do with my boba. (You

During my trip to Vietnam, I did a fan meet-up at iKem, the only shop in Vietnam making ice cream using liquid nitrogen. My cousins started the business and invited me to create some of the in-store flavors. I designed two: honey lavender (the recipe can be found in my cookbook) and matcha green tea. iKem appeals to children and teenagers because of the novel liquid nitrogen process. The fact that ice cream is frozen amidst a cloud of billowing smoke makes it Instagram-Worthy, and nowadays, that seems to be

Because I was born and raised in America, when I meet Vietnamese elders, they are often surprised that: (1) I can speak Vietnamese, and (2) I not only can eat, but love to eat, Vietnamese food. Then when I say I even love mam tom and mam nem, they are shocked. This is because mam tom and mam nem are the stinkiest of stinky sauces. If you thought nuoc mam, or fish sauce, was bad, wait till you get a whiff of this purple stuff! Truthfully, I love these pungent

Bun bo Hue is one of my favorite Vietnamese noodle soups of all time. The broth consists of beef, pork, lemongrass, chiles, and shrimp paste, making it a balance of sweet, sour, savory, and spicy. It’s amazing! We hung out with Summer of Danang Cuisine, and the first of two meals we had together was this noodle soup at Bun Bo Hue Ba Dieu. The shop tends to close on a whim if the pot’s run dry, so I was relieved when we arrived shortly after sunset, and they said

There are two, maybe three, dishes you definitely need to try in Hoi An: cao lau Madame Khanh’s banh mi mi Quang (optional) Cao lau Cao lau literally translates as “high floor.” Legend has it that back in the day when Hoi An was colonized by the French, those with money ate on the higher floors, and this dried noodle dish, full of fresh herbs and greens, was popular for its light, refreshing flavors. Today, tradition continues, and to eat this dish, you have to climb up to the restaurant’s

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