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Do it.

My husband told me about this a few weeks ago but stupid me forgot to blog about it, and now there’s only one day left to support the project. Doh! John and I have each individually pledged money towards the project, and I urge you on behalf of stylish blind people everywhere to do the same. Because products for the visually impaired are such a niche market, things designed for the blind are often awkward, not well thought out, bulky, less functional. Moreover, they’re downright ugly. Why do the products

And I mean that in all sense of the word “blind.” A few weeks ago, one of my best friends, Joanna, got married. I was fortunate enough to return the favor of being a bridesmaid in her wedding as she was in mine. I saw her go through most of the wedding planning, and while their engagement period was a fractionof mine (8 vs. 12 months), it reminded me of how hectic the engagement period (thus, wedding planning period) can be. At the beginning of Jo’s and Danny’s, John (who

Dan’s story

In my previous post about Dan, I expressed my sadness whenI learned by a text message from his mother Reny that he had died. In lieu of flowers, the Tan family asked for donations to the Guthy Jackson Charitable Foundation in order to advance the research in NMO. Over $20,000 were donated (the largest donation the Foundation had ever received), and more than 400 people attended Dan’s funeral. What an amazing life story. Before he was handicapped by NMO, Dan was a basketball athlete. On Sunday, the Ann Arbor news

Why money sucks

Here is a continuation of gripes I have as a blind person. Money sucks. Not in the philosophical sense, but physically. And to be specific, I mean U.S. money sucks. To be more specific, U.S. currency sucks, i.e. the actual 75% cotton and 25% linen bills that we (if we’re fortunate) carry around in our wallets every day. In most other countries I’ve visited, the currency takes the form of different sized (and thus, weighted) coins and different sized paper bills. While the U.S. has distinct coins with their varying

Because he had to. Okay, enough with my terrible rendition of an already terrible joke. A new year means new elected officials. David A. Paterson has stepped down from his gubernatorial position in New york, returning to a civilian lifestyle after more than 30 years in politics. During his office, he endured several comic jabs on “Saturday Night Live.” But not being able to see anything out of his left eye and only colors and large shapes out of his right, Paterson should be commended for attempting a public life

After attending the Dallas symposium and the L.A. conference, I was convinced I needed a new neurologist. While I’d been with Dr. Brod since my NMO diagnosis in 2003, I never felt completely confident nor comfortable with him as my primary neurologist. He did manage to pull through with getting me the Rituxan therapy, but there had been numerous times when he was not readily available during one of my attacks. Instead of getting a hold of him (who knew my case best), I would be connected to one of

After I was officially diagnosed with NMO in 2003, I went online in search of any information I could find about Devic’s. As it was such a rare disease, the search results were minimal. But I did find an online support group. This was where I met R whose son, D, had NMO. Throughout the years, during my most difficult attacks, R had been a constant support via emails and phone conversations. She gave me hope when life looked dim, lending her positivity to not only myself but others in

I got an email from the TMA a few weeks ago saying that some of the video recordings from the Dallas event are now available for viewing. To stream them online, you will need Flash or HTML5 (iPad or iPhone) enabled browsers. You can also download the videos in mpeg4 format for viewing offline. Either way, go here to watch, but before you do, make sure your brain is ready for the dense medical talk.

Holiday blues

Okay, so I was overly ambitious last week and claimed I would blog every day up until Christmas. I had the ideas all lined up in my head: holiday recipes, shopping suggestions, and so on. But then the days flew by, and I found myself busier and more tired than expected. Come Christmas Eve, I was wrapping gifts, making jam (which I had planned on bloggig about), and cleaning house. Then Christmas Day, I woke up early to start cooking, followed by four hours of my side of the family,

The blind trader

My friend, Heari, sent me this article about Ashish Goyal, a 30-year-old trader at JPMorganChase‘s London office. A graduate from Wharton, Goyal did not come upon this job easily. After receiving his first business degree from an accredited university in India, he had made the short list of candidates for several firms. But upon learning that he was blind, most companies turned Goyal away. By the time he reached the ING interview, he blurted, “I’m blind. Do you still want to talk?” Years later when he applied to Wharton, the

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