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On August 23rd, the #HowEyeSeeIt campaign launched, challenging those with vision to attempt a task or activity they enjoy while blindfolded. “https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Nc1aC4cGz8” target=”_blank”I shot a video with Chef Tim Love doing the blindfold challenge at his restaurant, “http://www.lonesomedoveknoxville.com” target=”_blank”Lonesome Dove, in Knoxville. I must say he was actually pretty good at cooking blind. The #HowEyeSeeIt is a campaign raising money to fight retinal diseases causing blindness on behalf of Foundation Fighting Blindness. The campaign runs until October 13th. Visit the #HowEyeSeeIt page to see how you can get involved, or

In my last post about how Apple TV makes television entertainment accessible for the Blind, I mentioned how I’ve been on a Netflix binge. Netflix has come such a long way since its baby years back when it was a DVD rental-by-mail concept. Now it’s a powerhouse putting out acclaimed original programming. I personally love “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmitt”, “Grace and Frankie”, “BoJack Horseman”, and “Master of None”. Now that you’ve judged my taste in television, I’ll tell you why I shower praises upon Netflix. In 2015, Netflix responded to a

Summer’s nearly over, so all that television binging is about to come to an end. But fall also marks the time for season premieres, so if you’re a true American, you’re right back on the couch, just like the potato you were a month ago. I’ve been on a Netflix binge lately (more on this later). And the awesome thing that allows me to watch (and I say “watch” in all hilarity) Netflix is my Apple TV. The hubs ordered the latest fourth generation Apple TV when it came out

It’s the dog days of summer for sure, and the one thing I wholly depend on in the midst of this heat is my Nest. We’ve been the proud owners of a Nest device for a few years now. Our version is the first-generation, and Nest is now on their third. The reason I love our Nest is because, as a blind user, it helps me regulate the home climate control system myself. Before we had a Nest, I used to FaceTime the hubs or a friend on my iPhone

To my fellow blind and visually impaired community, I’m excited to announce I’m involved in the production of a documentary with an Emmy award winning producer that focuses on the dating life of the blind and visually impaired. The goal of our project is to raise awareness and shed light on a population who is often marginalized. We are seeking women and men who are interested in participating in the film. If you are single and actively dating, we would like to hear from you. We are also seeking the

Last April, I was invited to teach a cooking workshop at the W Ross MacDonald School in Brantford, Ontario, Canada. A little background on WRMS: founded in 1872, the school teaches blind and blind-deaf students from grades K through 12. There are currently around 200 enrolled students. With a grant received from the Ministry of Education in Ontario, WRMS created a Healthier Eating Program with the purpose of teaching students the importance of health and nutrition. As part of the program, I was asked to lead a one-day workshop and

When the hubs first told me he bought the Amazon Echo during pre-sale, I rolled my eyes and thought it would just be another gimmicky gadget that would eventually collect a layer of dust in the corner of our home. Then Alexa (the name Echo came with) was delivered on our doorstep, and as soon as the hubs plugged her in, she became an irreplaceable part of our family. Okay, I can practically feel the breeze of your eyes rolling, but I have to say, Echo is a life changer.

This is my last entry on my four-part series on traveling like a pro. I’ve already written advice on how to book cheap flights, how to pack your bags, and how to travel if you’re blind. Now here’s tips on how to make your arrival and trip go as smoothly as possible. It all starts way before you even pack your bags and leave for your destination. Do your research. Where are you going to stay? What are you going to do? All very important questions that contribute to the

This post is geared towards the vision impaired and their travel companions, but it could also be useful for the sighted. Use your cane or service dog. When I first lost my vision, I didn’t like to pull out my cane because I didn’t want to be viewed as disabled or treated differently. I left my cane folded up in my bag, took the arm of my travel companion, and then bumped into people left and right, probably collecting dirty looks along the way. Nobody dodged me—obviously, nobody knew I

That’s a montage of my last Korea trip in 2012. I love to travel, but packing for a trip is one of its ugly necessities. When I was younger (and much less an avid traveler), packing for a trip was exciting. It meant I was about to go somewhere new or fun, and I enjoyed poring over which items to fold in to my suitcase or duffel bag. Unpacking, on the other hand, was less appealing—it was the mark that my vacation was over, and I’d soon be rejoining the

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