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To my fellow blind and visually impaired community, I’m excited to announce I’m involved in the production of a documentary with an Emmy award winning producer that focuses on the dating life of the blind and visually impaired. The goal of our project is to raise awareness and shed light on a population who is often marginalized. We are seeking women and men who are interested in participating in the film. If you are single and actively dating, we would like to hear from you. We are also seeking the

Last April, I was invited to teach a cooking workshop at the W Ross MacDonald School in Brantford, Ontario, Canada. A little background on WRMS: founded in 1872, the school teaches blind and blind-deaf students from grades K through 12. There are currently around 200 enrolled students. With a grant received from the Ministry of Education in Ontario, WRMS created a Healthier Eating Program with the purpose of teaching students the importance of health and nutrition. As part of the program, I was asked to lead a one-day workshop and

When the hubs first told me he bought the Amazon Echo during pre-sale, I rolled my eyes and thought it would just be another gimmicky gadget that would eventually collect a layer of dust in the corner of our home. Then Alexa (the name Echo came with) was delivered on our doorstep, and as soon as the hubs plugged her in, she became an irreplaceable part of our family. Okay, I can practically feel the breeze of your eyes rolling, but I have to say, Echo is a life changer.

This is my last entry on my four-part series on traveling like a pro. I’ve already written advice on how to book cheap flights, how to pack your bags, and how to travel if you’re blind. Now here’s tips on how to make your arrival and trip go as smoothly as possible. It all starts way before you even pack your bags and leave for your destination. Do your research. Where are you going to stay? What are you going to do? All very important questions that contribute to the

This post is geared towards the vision impaired and their travel companions, but it could also be useful for the sighted. Use your cane or service dog. When I first lost my vision, I didn’t like to pull out my cane because I didn’t want to be viewed as disabled or treated differently. I left my cane folded up in my bag, took the arm of my travel companion, and then bumped into people left and right, probably collecting dirty looks along the way. Nobody dodged me—obviously, nobody knew I

That’s a montage of my last Korea trip in 2012. I love to travel, but packing for a trip is one of its ugly necessities. When I was younger (and much less an avid traveler), packing for a trip was exciting. It meant I was about to go somewhere new or fun, and I enjoyed poring over which items to fold in to my suitcase or duffel bag. Unpacking, on the other hand, was less appealing—it was the mark that my vacation was over, and I’d soon be rejoining the

Because summer is nearing, I’ve decided to blog a travel series. I’ve always loved to travel, and I’ve been fortunate to do it a lot more now ever since MasterChef fame. I fly close to, if not more than, 100K miles a year, so I would say I’m a pretty experienced traveler. It never fails to amuse me when TSA employees or flight attendants ask me, “Have you ever flown before?” simply because I’m vision impaired. C’mon, people! Do blind people not get around on planes like the rest of

Jameson is my favorite go-to whiskey. It’s smooth, sweet, and consistent. I like mine on a rock—that is, I like mine served with just one ice cube. It’s enough to mellow the whiskey out even more, but not enough to water it down. The hubs is a big Jameson fan, too. It was his call to stock the bar at our wedding with Jameson. My father gave him a bottle of 18-year-old Jameson for Christmas one year. We drank it lovingly. So of course, when in Dublin, we had to

I’ve already had Irish coffee first thing in the morning, the breakfast of champions, so why not continue the routine? When in Dublin… It’s a good idea to hit up the Guinness Storehouse early—we opted for mid-morning—as the place gets overrun by crowds after lunch. (Hours of operation are from 9:30 AM to 5 PM daily.) The Storehouse is built to resemble a pint glass, and after you pay an admission fee, you get a short tour (more like a brief introduction to Guinness and the founder, Arthur Guinness) and

March is National Save Your Vision Month, so today, I welcome a guest post from the Medical Research Charities on behalf of Foundation Fighting Blindness. *** In support of National Save Your Vision Month, we want to shine some light on conditions causing blindness and ways you can get involved with the discovery of treatments and cures. h5>Support medical research One of the best ways to get involved is to support organizations that fund research to better understand and treat serious retinal diseases. Medical Research Charities sponsors a number of

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