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Cook it.

I’m not a celebrant of Valentine’s Day, since I think it’s mostly an unnecessary jaunt through over-consumerism, but tomorrow is the hubs’s birthday, so I thought I’d honor him with a recipe for one of his favorite foods. The hubs loves a good burger. In Houston, our current favorite burger joint is Stanton’s City Bites, but why not make it at home yourself? I grew up eating McDonald’s, and even though fast food, especially those Golden Arches, spurs such contempt in our current health-conscious generation, I can’t deny I still

Translated from Korean as “mixed rice,” bibimbap is the dish I recall eating on my first morning in Seoul, Korea. It was at the counter of a food court stall, and although bibimbap is nothing fancy, there’s something comforting about the one-bowl meal, especially when it is served in a sizzling stone bowl. Although I didn’t eat bibimbap during my last trip to L.A., I wanted to pay tribute to Korean cuisine since I did eat a lot of that. Bibimbap is a quick and easy recipe that’s flavorful yet

As promised, I’m going to start posting recipes inspired by my travels, and I’m interrupting the L.A. series to bring you a recipe inspired by my visit to London. You might ask what does Indian have to do with London, but rumor has it London is home to some of the best Indian food in the world, even better than (gasp!) India itself. My theory behind this is similar to why I believe America has better pho than Vietnam: quite simply, the quality of ingredients are superior in the est.

One of my favorite foods to eat in Vietnam, cua rang me—crabs sautéed in tamarind—is a humble yet glorious dish prized for its freshness and balance of flavor. It’s best eaten with the hands and a chilled lager (or three), followed by a hearty serving of French bread, which is broken off the community loaf and use to mop the vibrant, sweet sauce. A fond memory of childhood summers is weekend trips to the Gulf Coast, where in addition to playing in the murky brown water, I’d help my parents

Back in January, I wrote a post about what to cook and eat on a ski/snowboard trip—basically foods that were easy to prepare, provided ample sustenance, and could warm you from the outside in. It’s May now, and summer is officially a few weeks away. In Houston, where temperatures have reached the lower nineties on occasion, summer’s already here. This means it’s camp time!

Having first learned to cook as a college student with very limited funds, I’ve had my fair share of crappy cutting boards. Moreover, as a novice cook, I did not know how to take care of these cutting boards, thereby contributing to their crappiness. My first cutting board was wooden, and although I knew not to run it through the dishwasher—oh wait, my first college apartment didn’t have a dishwasher—I had no idea wooden boards needed to be oiled to keep from splitting. So for a long time, I used

We have a friend who loves to fish. I mean, he’s one serious fisherman. He drives to our neighboring state of Louisiana on the weekends to go deep-sea fishing. He went halfsies on a boat with his dad so they could take fishing trips together. He’s getting married this summer, and for his bachelor trip, he’s going to Costa Rica on—you guessed it—a fishing trip. (I’ve been told by the hubs there are other activities on the agenda, but we’ll see what really happens when you put the old man

If you follow me on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram, you would know I spent last weekend in Breckenridge, Colorado, on a ski/snowboard trip with friends and family (more on this to come in a later post). Today, we’re going to focus on food. It’s an unwelcome dilemma every time: what will be filling enough to satiate 8 to 12 hungry folks but easy enough to prepare when everyone’s exhausted from all the physical activity? And don’t forget that nearby markets may be limited in ingredient selection so no Sichuan, no

My mama-in-law likes to gift us Asian pears. They are large and juicy with sweet, crispy flesh. I’ve made them into pear, blueberry, and banana juice, and we’ve eaten many of them purely sliced as a snack. But they are quite sizable, so we often can’t go through them as quickly as we receive them. I don’t like to waste food, so poaching them allows me to prolong their refrigerator shelf life and, more selfishly, my own enjoyment of their unique succulence.

As promised, here is the remainder of my holiday gift ideas for the home cook, just in time for those procrastinators out there. Like I previously mentioned, most all of these items are available on Amazon, so you can select that crucial next-day or second-day delivery option. For my fellow blind readers, Amazon has an accessible app; I just used it at 3 AM to order some stuff. (Yes, I tend to shop or read about food online when I have insomnia–don’t judge.)

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