Posts in Category

Cook it.

I recently wrote about Rodney’s Oyster House and Pearl Diver—both seafood restaurants in Toronto—so to close out my Canada series, I’ve got a crab roll recipe for you today. But it’s not your traditional crab roll. It’s crab rolls with a Japanese twist. I have an affinity for wasabi mayo because it’s creamy, clears your sinuses, and goes so well with seafood. I made these crab rolls for a corporate event I did in New York, and they were a hit. I chose crab over lobster because, frankly, I tend

This Monday is Memorial Day, the official day we commemorate soldiers who have given their lives for our country. It’s a national holiday and also signifies the kick-off of summer. All across America, and especially in the South, thousands of grills (and barbecue-goers) will get lit! Because meat is generally the main focus of the grill, the sides often get glossed over. But as we all know the sides are what make the Thanksgiving meal, I’m not going to give you yet another meat recipe today. Instead, I’m going to

It seems every city we visited in the UK and Ireland had a rendition of the good ol’, popular fish ’n chips. It’s no wonder, because the stuff is quick, easy, cheap, filling, and delicious. Fish ’n chips may be a British-born dish, but I grew up eating at Long John Silver’s, which has a similar offering of fried seafood and fried potatoes (called “fries” in the U.S. And “chips” in the UK and Ireland—and in case you are wondering, what Americans call “chips” are known as “crisps” over there).

Easter has come and gone, and now you’re stuck with a dozen hard-boiled eggs. You can be healthy and eat two at a time for a quick breakfast or one as a mid-morning snack, but that’s boring. How about an egg salad sandwich instead? Quick and easy, egg salad is a make-ahead item that you can leave in your refrigerator for the week and use as you go. You can even dump some in a bowl and eat straight-up with a spoon for a light meal. It’s the ultimate lazy

Since today is Leap Day, I’ve invited the hubs to guest blog. Leap Day tradition has genders switching roles for 24 hours—for example, women are supposed to propose to men on February 29th—but my idea of an exciting switch-up is to have John post instead. “You can post whatever you want: a rant, a review, or random thoughts,” was my parameter for his post. Being married to a cook (and being a very good cook himself), the hubs chose to write a recipe. Introducing John Suh, aka the hubs. ***

can’t recall the last time I had a cough this persistent. It’s been over a month, and I can’t shake the damn thing. I’ve gone through OTC cough syrup and two prescription sizzurps—first with codeine, and then with hydrocodone. I coughed so much, I injured my diaphragm. My poor hubs—he dodged my germs for four weeks. But then his body succumbed, and he got sick, too. Fortunately, neither of us had the flu. My cold just lasts a long time because I have a very low immune system due to

I’m not a celebrant of Valentine’s Day, since I think it’s mostly an unnecessary jaunt through over-consumerism, but tomorrow is the hubs’s birthday, so I thought I’d honor him with a recipe for one of his favorite foods. The hubs loves a good burger. In Houston, our current favorite burger joint is Stanton’s City Bites, but why not make it at home yourself? I grew up eating McDonald’s, and even though fast food, especially those Golden Arches, spurs such contempt in our current health-conscious generation, I can’t deny I still

Translated from Korean as “mixed rice,” bibimbap is the dish I recall eating on my first morning in Seoul, Korea. It was at the counter of a food court stall, and although bibimbap is nothing fancy, there’s something comforting about the one-bowl meal, especially when it is served in a sizzling stone bowl. Although I didn’t eat bibimbap during my last trip to L.A., I wanted to pay tribute to Korean cuisine since I did eat a lot of that. Bibimbap is a quick and easy recipe that’s flavorful yet

As promised, I’m going to start posting recipes inspired by my travels, and I’m interrupting the L.A. series to bring you a recipe inspired by my visit to London. You might ask what does Indian have to do with London, but rumor has it London is home to some of the best Indian food in the world, even better than (gasp!) India itself. My theory behind this is similar to why I believe America has better pho than Vietnam: quite simply, the quality of ingredients are superior in the est.

One of my favorite foods to eat in Vietnam, cua rang me—crabs sautéed in tamarind—is a humble yet glorious dish prized for its freshness and balance of flavor. It’s best eaten with the hands and a chilled lager (or three), followed by a hearty serving of French bread, which is broken off the community loaf and use to mop the vibrant, sweet sauce. A fond memory of childhood summers is weekend trips to the Gulf Coast, where in addition to playing in the murky brown water, I’d help my parents

1 2 3 9 Page 1 of 9