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Cook it.

My first memories of biscuits were the kind you find in the frozen aisle at the grocery store, hugging a sad piece of shriveled sausage and suffocating inside cellophane. My mama bought boxes of these and would instruct me to microwave one every morning for breakfast. It was so dry and boring—oh, how I wished there was a little egg or slice of American cheese tucked in there to give it a little lube. Then I moved on to better biscuits—the ones that come as part of a fried chicken

If you’ve been following the trend my blog’s been taking, you may have noticed I’ll post my travel vlogs with the hubs, followed by casual reviews of places at which we ate or visited, followed by a recipe or two inspired by the trip. I’m always asked in interviews, “What’s your favorite dish to cook?” My answer, which I assume is disappointing to audiences but is the truth, is that I don’t have one particular dish I love cooking. I love variety, and I love learning, so it only makes

When I’m feeling fancy, I like to call this “fish sauce vinaigrette” or even “anchovy vinaigrette.” Essentially, it’s the vital finishing touch on scores of Vietnamese dishes. It can be used as a dipping sauce, a condiment, or a dressing. If you know how to make this one recipe, you’ll have the key to unlock an arsenal of Vietnamese dishes. The Vietnamese name for this sauce is nuoc mam cham—“nuoc mam” referring to the fish sauce and “cham” meaning “to dip.” I’m showing you this recipe as a prelude to

For most of my life, I didn’t care for hot pot;in my opinion, it was a dish in which too many things were going on, and yet they all soaked up the same, monotonous flavor from the boiling broth. That is, until I had Little Sheep Mongolian Hot Pot when it opened an outpost in Houston some years back. That was where I learned the broth is only half the game. Hot pot is also about the dipping sauce. Since then, hot pot has become a regular meal in our

Following my post about Russian River Brewing Co. in which I raved about their pizzas, I’m sharing my unfussy recipe for Margherita pizza. I like the simplicity of a Margherita, which is traditionally topped with only three ingredients: fresh plum tomatoes, fresh mozzarella, and fresh sweet basil. In case you hadn’t noticed, the colors of the three toppings are red, white, and green—coincidentally (on purpose) the same colors as the flag of Italia. It’s popular belief that a chef made the tri-colored pizza for Queen Margherita of Savoy during her

We’re deep into barbecue season, and with Independence Day on Monday, my birthday gift to America (and you, dear readers) will be this ethnic take on grilled meat. It also happens to be my pops’s birthday, and the man does love his beef, so I thought I’d honor him, too, by choosing a beef recipe (just like how I’d done a burger recipe when it was the hubs’s birthday). My pops moved back to Vietnam after retirement, and whenever he’s asked what he misses most about America (and Texas in

I recently wrote about Rodney’s Oyster House and Pearl Diver—both seafood restaurants in Toronto—so to close out my Canada series, I’ve got a crab roll recipe for you today. But it’s not your traditional crab roll. It’s crab rolls with a Japanese twist. I have an affinity for wasabi mayo because it’s creamy, clears your sinuses, and goes so well with seafood. I made these crab rolls for a corporate event I did in New York, and they were a hit. I chose crab over lobster because, frankly, I tend

My papa-in-law loves crab, so for an early Father’s Day, the hubs and I made white pepper crab for my in-laws. It was perfect timing because I needed to create a Singaporean-style recipe anyway for the blog, following my recent posts on Singapore. While white pepper crab falls behind chile crab and black pepper crab in terms of popularity, I found its flavor to be quite nice—not too overbearing in the heat department, a little sweet and salty, a bit of umami. And living near the Gulf of Mexico, I

This Monday is Memorial Day, the official day we commemorate soldiers who have given their lives for our country. It’s a national holiday and also signifies the kick-off of summer. All across America, and especially in the South, thousands of grills (and barbecue-goers) will get lit! Because meat is generally the main focus of the grill, the sides often get glossed over. But as we all know the sides are what make the Thanksgiving meal, I’m not going to give you yet another meat recipe today. Instead, I’m going to

It seems every city we visited in the UK and Ireland had a rendition of the good ol’, popular fish ’n chips. It’s no wonder, because the stuff is quick, easy, cheap, filling, and delicious. Fish ’n chips may be a British-born dish, but I grew up eating at Long John Silver’s, which has a similar offering of fried seafood and fried potatoes (called “fries” in the U.S. And “chips” in the UK and Ireland—and in case you are wondering, what Americans call “chips” are known as “crisps” over there).

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