Ta da! The main entree served with the roasted new red potatoes and the country green beans is prime rib.

I have not had the privilege to consume a lot of prime rib in my life, but I can tell you the best prime rib I’ve had is at San Francisco’s House of Prime Rib. They serve succulent slices of prime rib cut off the cart right in front of your table. And the best thing is seconds are on the house. They don’t advertise this on the menu but guests are allowed a second serving of prime rib–all one has to do is ask.

I decided to do a prime rib with horeseradish cream sauce for this year’s Christmas lunch because my dad was tired of fried turkey, and as the thought of roasting a duck for the first time at a family holiday gathering was intimidating, I settled on prime rib instead. Originally, I was going to purchase a pre-marinated prime rib from Costco but when I realized that marinating your own prime rib was a fairly simple process, I decided to forego the ready-to-go prime rib at $8.99/lb. and go for the naked slab of USDA beef at $7.99/lb. I bought a five-pound hunk of prime rib, assuming that my family, with their dainty appetites, will only eat about half a pound each. (I heard my relatives are also bringing lobster and chicken wings.)

The must-have tool for cooking prime rib (and just about any big chunk of meat, for that matter) is the digital meat thermometer. We got ours last-minute from Target the other night for roughly $20. Cooking meats–whether it’s beef, pork, and chicken, and whether you roast, grill, or fry it–requires an exact temperature reading to indicate doneness. It’s a shame I’ve been cooking all these years without using one; I usually just get John to cut the meat open and look to see if it’s pink or bloody or done. But as cooking is as much a science as it is an art, the best way to produce consistent, edible, and desirable results is to use a thermometer. There are even digital talking thermometers for the blind, and I will one day get to blogging about all these independent living aids for the blind (I know I keep saying that, but I promise.)

The prime rib should be served with two sauces: an au jus and a horseradish. Au jus is French for “with juice,. In French cooking, au jus is usually made by taking the natural drippings from the roasted meat and served as an accompaniment to enhance flavor. In American cooking, however, au jus refers to a sauce that may or may not be made from the pan drippings but is almost always prepared by combining other ingredients such as beef broth, soy sauce, or worcestershire sauce and reduced to a sometimes gravy-like consistency. American au jus is frequently made separately using additional external ingredients whereas the French au jus is purer in the sense that it’s the natural juices produced during cooking.

Horseradish cream sauce provides a little creamy kick to the savory meat. I find that horseradish meshes well with beef: think of a roast beef sandwich topped with horseradish sauce. (Hello–Arby’s!) So without further adieu, here are the triple decker recipes to make prime rib, au jus, and horseradish sauce.

Note: Pictures to come after Christmas.

 

Recipe: Prime Rib

Summary: Original recipe from All Recipes

Ingredients

  • 1 (5 lb.) standing beef rib roast
  • 2 tsp. kosher or rock salt
  • 1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tsp. garlic powder or more to taste

Instructions

  1. Allow roast to stand at room tempreature for at least 1 hr.–very important!
  2. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Combine salt, pepper, and garlic powder in a sm. bowl. Place the rib roast on a rack in the roasting pan, fatty side up. Rub seasoning on the roast.
  3. Place the thermometer in the meat, and roast in oven for 1 hr. Turn off oven, and let roast sit inside the oven for 2 to 3 hrs. Do not open oven door–the roast is still cooking. Before serving, turn the oven back on to 375 degrees and roast for another 30 min. or so to heat through. The internal temperature should read at least 145 degrees when ready. Remove from oven and let sit for 10 min. before carving and serving. Serve with au jus and horseradish sauce.

Meal type: dinner

Culinary tradition: USA (General)

Microformatting by hRecipe.

Recipe: Au Jus

Ingredients

  • 1 (10.5 oz.) can French onion soup
  • 1 (10.5 oz.) can beef broth
  • 1 can cold water
  • 1/2 tsp. white sugar
  • 2 tsp. worcestershire sauce
  • 1/8 tsp. salt

Instructions

  1. Bring ingredients to boil in a med. saucepan. Strain, discard onions, and serve in sm. ramekins alongside prime rib.

Quick Notes

Makes 3.5 cups. Can be made 2 days ahead.

Cooking time (duration): 5

Meal type: dinner

Culinary tradition: USA (General)

Microformatting by hRecipe.

Recipe: Horseradish Cream Sauce

Ingredients

  • 1/2 c. sour cream
  • 1/4 c. prepared horseradish
  • 1 tsp. salt

Instructions

  1. Combine ingredients. Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hr. to develop flavors. Serve in sm. ramekins alongside prime rib.

Quick Notes

Makes 1.25 cups. Can be made 2 days ahead.

Cooking time (duration): 5

Diet type: Vegetarian

Meal type: dinner

Culinary tradition: USA (General)

Microformatting by hRecipe.

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9 Discussion to this post

  1. […] Holiday Recipes from The Blind Cook blog: Bring savory slices of prime rib to your dinner table with your choice of au jus and horseradish sauces. Ha recommends a digital meat thermometer to make sure the prime rib comes out perfect. http://www.theblindcook.com/2010/12/22/prime-rib-au-jus-with-horseradish-sauce/ […]

  2. dana says:

    horseradish is great. It goes well with everything if it's used in just the right amount.

  3. mihai says:

    mmmmmm This sound absolutely amazing. I love everything about it. The horseradish should be a perfect touch.

  4. iuliana says:

    I know what I'm eating this weekend. It will be amazing. Hope my friends like it.

  5. Horseradish is great. Everything goes in all, if it is used in the right amount.

  6. William says:

    I am curious as to why it is important to let the roast stand at room temperature for 1 hour. If you are implying that a 5 lb. rib roast will come to room temperature in 1 hour, believe me you are totally wrong!

    • Christine Ha says:

      Good question. It’s not going to cool completely to room temp in an hour. The point is to cool AT room temp—basically you’re letting it rest to retain juices before slicing. Otherwise, if you slice immediately after roasting, it will leak juices.

  7. Anne Jackson says:

    I printed – or tried to – pages 2 thru 4, and the printed pages overlapped the text and I had a picture of the woman on each page. I wasn't happy so I tried a totally different printer. The same thing happened! SO, I got mad at my husband because I thought it was his printer. After our little argument, he showed me something called "Snippit" and I printed that. It worked just fine. There were too many steps to get to that point and I'm not gonna take time for just a simple recipe. Needless to say, this one – rather it's good or not – will not see me 'visiting' it again. My husband said it had something to do with the code in the recipe. I don't know, but it was really frustrating.

    • Christine Ha says:

      Hello, and thanks for your feedback. The photo overlapping the recipe is me. 🙂 Sorry you’re having this printing issue, but I’ve recently changed the template on my blog, and there are still some bugs we’re trying to fix. I’m visually impaired so I need the assistance of others to help me fix any visual formatting on the page, but your issue is noted. I hope to have it fixed soon. And all comments go through an approval process before getting published on the page so that’s why your comments didn’t show up as soon as you submitted it. Thanks.

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